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David Crook, Orlando di Lasso’s Imitation Magnificats for Counter‐Reformation Munich

David Crook, Orlando di Lasso’s Imitation Magnificats for Counter‐Reformation Munich Answers to questions – or at least new and valuable paths of investigation – can often be found by looking in seemingly out-of-the-way places. David Crook provides support for this proposition in his study of the imitation Magnificats of Orlando di Lasso. While Lasso’s 101 Magnificats were an important part of his output, they represent a repertoire largely ignored in study and performance. Moreover, forty of these works make use of an atypical compositional technique for this genre: imitation or ‘parody’. Crook’s study, laudable in both its planning and execution, centres on this small portion of Lasso’s immense and varied corpus, presenting these works within a broad yet well-defined context, while also elegantly establishing their importance. In so doing, the author transcends the limited interest of a small sub-genre and provides us with fresh ways of looking at issues central to our investigation of the music of this period. Given the richness of the material in view, any critical response might seek to establish multiple points of perspective on Crook’s study. However, in the present instance, I would like to adopt the same three broad-based headings beneath which the author himself aims to group issues of type and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

David Crook, Orlando di Lasso’s Imitation Magnificats for Counter‐Reformation Munich

Music Analysis , Volume 18 (2) – Jul 1, 1999

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Blackwell Publishers Ltd 1999
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/1468-2249.00094
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Answers to questions – or at least new and valuable paths of investigation – can often be found by looking in seemingly out-of-the-way places. David Crook provides support for this proposition in his study of the imitation Magnificats of Orlando di Lasso. While Lasso’s 101 Magnificats were an important part of his output, they represent a repertoire largely ignored in study and performance. Moreover, forty of these works make use of an atypical compositional technique for this genre: imitation or ‘parody’. Crook’s study, laudable in both its planning and execution, centres on this small portion of Lasso’s immense and varied corpus, presenting these works within a broad yet well-defined context, while also elegantly establishing their importance. In so doing, the author transcends the limited interest of a small sub-genre and provides us with fresh ways of looking at issues central to our investigation of the music of this period. Given the richness of the material in view, any critical response might seek to establish multiple points of perspective on Crook’s study. However, in the present instance, I would like to adopt the same three broad-based headings beneath which the author himself aims to group issues of type and

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jul 1, 1999

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