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Contingent conversations build more than language: How communicative interactions in toddlerhood relate to preschool executive function skills

Contingent conversations build more than language: How communicative interactions in toddlerhood... INTRODUCTIONHigh‐quality interactions between caregivers and children lay a foundation for social and cognitive development (e.g., Bernier et al., 2010; Fay‐Stammbach et al., 2014; Jennings et al., 2008). Communicative engagement is particularly important. Smooth and balanced communication patterns between caregiver and child during play predicted child language a year later and accounted for far more variance than the amount of talk the caregiver used or the caregiver's sensitivity (Hirsh‐Pasek et al., 2015; Masek, Paterson et al., 2021). A key feature of communicative engagement is conversational turn‐taking. Conversational turn‐taking between caregivers and 18‐month‐old infants predicted significant variability in language skills up to 10 years later (Gilkerson et al., 2018). However, communicative interactions may support more than language. Aspects of caregiver‐child interaction have been found to predict executive function (EF), a constellation of skills related to the control of attention, cognitive resources, and behavior (Bernier et al., 2010; Distefano et al., 2018; Jennings et al., 2008; Masek, McMillan et al., 2021). Some researchers posit that relations between caregiver‐child interaction and child EF are mediated by child language (Ayoub et al., 2011; Matte‐Gagné & Bernier, 2011). Using structural equation modeling, we expand upon prior research by examining how communicative, dyadic engagement observed between parent and child contributes to variability in children's EF skills, and how children's budding http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Science Wiley

Contingent conversations build more than language: How communicative interactions in toddlerhood relate to preschool executive function skills

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
ISSN
1363-755X
eISSN
1467-7687
DOI
10.1111/desc.13338
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONHigh‐quality interactions between caregivers and children lay a foundation for social and cognitive development (e.g., Bernier et al., 2010; Fay‐Stammbach et al., 2014; Jennings et al., 2008). Communicative engagement is particularly important. Smooth and balanced communication patterns between caregiver and child during play predicted child language a year later and accounted for far more variance than the amount of talk the caregiver used or the caregiver's sensitivity (Hirsh‐Pasek et al., 2015; Masek, Paterson et al., 2021). A key feature of communicative engagement is conversational turn‐taking. Conversational turn‐taking between caregivers and 18‐month‐old infants predicted significant variability in language skills up to 10 years later (Gilkerson et al., 2018). However, communicative interactions may support more than language. Aspects of caregiver‐child interaction have been found to predict executive function (EF), a constellation of skills related to the control of attention, cognitive resources, and behavior (Bernier et al., 2010; Distefano et al., 2018; Jennings et al., 2008; Masek, McMillan et al., 2021). Some researchers posit that relations between caregiver‐child interaction and child EF are mediated by child language (Ayoub et al., 2011; Matte‐Gagné & Bernier, 2011). Using structural equation modeling, we expand upon prior research by examining how communicative, dyadic engagement observed between parent and child contributes to variability in children's EF skills, and how children's budding

Journal

Developmental ScienceWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2022

Keywords: caregiver‐child interaction; executive function; infancy; language development; preschool

References