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Compromise, Conflation and Contextualism in English Music(ology)

Compromise, Conflation and Contextualism in English Music(ology) CONTEXTUALISM IN ENGLISH For much of this century within English (and, by often dubious extension, British) academe, musicologists of whatever cultural bent have tended to ply their trades according to oddly discrete, non-overlapping strategies of study and discourse. This curiously extreme form of epistemological apartheid, while by no means unique to the native tradition, has persisted long after many other subject fields within both the humanities and the sciences have embraced interdisciplinary interpretation with open minds. Indeed, Nattiez's widelydisseminated semiological tripartition notwithstanding, the division of intellectual labour still most typically operative is that represented by the current mainstays of home-based musicological publishing, namely, the `Lifeand-Works' monograph and the `Handbook'. Throughout its venerable existence, the former genre has been envisaged as a portmanteau attempt to engage in biographical, historical and (to a lesser extent) technical exploration of the elements that comprise the semiotic package represented by the phrase, `the great composer' ± of which there are so many famous examples that it is invidious to single out a handful for inclusion here.1 Studies of this kind have a distinguished English-language history that stretches back at least to Edward Dent's pioneering text on Busoni (1933), and have often been aimed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Compromise, Conflation and Contextualism in English Music(ology)

Music Analysis , Volume 19 (2) – Jul 1, 2000

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/1468-2249.00119
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CONTEXTUALISM IN ENGLISH For much of this century within English (and, by often dubious extension, British) academe, musicologists of whatever cultural bent have tended to ply their trades according to oddly discrete, non-overlapping strategies of study and discourse. This curiously extreme form of epistemological apartheid, while by no means unique to the native tradition, has persisted long after many other subject fields within both the humanities and the sciences have embraced interdisciplinary interpretation with open minds. Indeed, Nattiez's widelydisseminated semiological tripartition notwithstanding, the division of intellectual labour still most typically operative is that represented by the current mainstays of home-based musicological publishing, namely, the `Lifeand-Works' monograph and the `Handbook'. Throughout its venerable existence, the former genre has been envisaged as a portmanteau attempt to engage in biographical, historical and (to a lesser extent) technical exploration of the elements that comprise the semiotic package represented by the phrase, `the great composer' ± of which there are so many famous examples that it is invidious to single out a handful for inclusion here.1 Studies of this kind have a distinguished English-language history that stretches back at least to Edward Dent's pioneering text on Busoni (1933), and have often been aimed

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2000

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