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Comparison of Soil‐Test Extractants for Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium, Sulfur, and Micronutrients in Idaho Soils

Comparison of Soil‐Test Extractants for Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium, Sulfur, and Micronutrients... AbbreviationsAAammonium acetateAASatomic adsorption spectrophotometerDTPAdiethylene triamine pentaacetic acidEDTAethylene diamine tetra acetic acidH3AHaney, Haney, Hossner, ArnoldICAP‐AESinductively coupled argon plasma–atomic emission spectroscopyICinorganic carbonM‐3Mehlich‐3NLINproc nonlinear split line modelSEstandard errorSOMsoil organic matterSoil testing is the primary means to evaluate soil fertility status, nutrient management strategies, and environmental stewardship. Chemical extractions represent the main method used and vary based on the nutrient of interest as well as the inherent properties of the soil being analyzed (Miller et al., 2013; Martins et al., 2015). A wide range of soil tests with different extraction properties have been developed or proposed for recommendations in soils and crops found in the United States (e.g., Olsen et al., 1954; Doll and Lucas, 1973; Lindsay and Norvell, 1978; Mehlich, 1984; Haney et al., 2006). These soil tests provide an index of nutrient availability, and agronomic recommendations are determined based on field correlation and calibration trials for specific crops (Brown, 1987). Comparisons among tests is often impossible, as only the specific test used in the region at the time of development was investigated, thus making comparison or establishment of new tests difficult due to the amount of research efforts needed to correlate and calibrate the tests again.In the western United States, a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

Comparison of Soil‐Test Extractants for Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium, Sulfur, and Micronutrients in Idaho Soils

9 pages

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Society of Agronomy
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.2134/age2019.08.0067
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsAAammonium acetateAASatomic adsorption spectrophotometerDTPAdiethylene triamine pentaacetic acidEDTAethylene diamine tetra acetic acidH3AHaney, Haney, Hossner, ArnoldICAP‐AESinductively coupled argon plasma–atomic emission spectroscopyICinorganic carbonM‐3Mehlich‐3NLINproc nonlinear split line modelSEstandard errorSOMsoil organic matterSoil testing is the primary means to evaluate soil fertility status, nutrient management strategies, and environmental stewardship. Chemical extractions represent the main method used and vary based on the nutrient of interest as well as the inherent properties of the soil being analyzed (Miller et al., 2013; Martins et al., 2015). A wide range of soil tests with different extraction properties have been developed or proposed for recommendations in soils and crops found in the United States (e.g., Olsen et al., 1954; Doll and Lucas, 1973; Lindsay and Norvell, 1978; Mehlich, 1984; Haney et al., 2006). These soil tests provide an index of nutrient availability, and agronomic recommendations are determined based on field correlation and calibration trials for specific crops (Brown, 1987). Comparisons among tests is often impossible, as only the specific test used in the region at the time of development was investigated, thus making comparison or establishment of new tests difficult due to the amount of research efforts needed to correlate and calibrate the tests again.In the western United States, a

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2019

References