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Cognitive sequelae of repeated head injury in a population of intravenous drug users

Cognitive sequelae of repeated head injury in a population of intravenous drug users The relationship between closed head injury and performance on neuropsychological (NP) tests was investigated in a group of intravenous drug users (IVDUs). Subjects with repeated head traumas involving loss of consciousness (LOC) performed worse than both a control group without LOC and reference group with only a single episode of LOC. There were no significant differences between the last two groups. Performance on tests of memory, attention, and motor performance was significantly worse in the group with repeated head injury. The average time since the last episode of LOC was more than 11 years. We conclude from these findings that a single episode of LOC does not result in significant cognitive impairment in this population. Two or more episodes, however, are more likely to produce chronic cognitive impairment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Psychology Wiley

Cognitive sequelae of repeated head injury in a population of intravenous drug users

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References (43)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0036-5564
eISSN
1467-9450
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-9450.1995.tb00984.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The relationship between closed head injury and performance on neuropsychological (NP) tests was investigated in a group of intravenous drug users (IVDUs). Subjects with repeated head traumas involving loss of consciousness (LOC) performed worse than both a control group without LOC and reference group with only a single episode of LOC. There were no significant differences between the last two groups. Performance on tests of memory, attention, and motor performance was significantly worse in the group with repeated head injury. The average time since the last episode of LOC was more than 11 years. We conclude from these findings that a single episode of LOC does not result in significant cognitive impairment in this population. Two or more episodes, however, are more likely to produce chronic cognitive impairment.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of PsychologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1995

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