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Changes in Soybean Yield Components in Response to Dicamba

Changes in Soybean Yield Components in Response to Dicamba Abbreviationsa.e.acid equivalenta.i.active ingredientDATdays after treatmentDGAdiglycolamineDMAdimethylamineLSULouisiana State UniversityOMorganic matterRecent development of dicamba (3,6‐dichloro‐2‐methoxybenzoic acid)–resistant soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] has allowed for control of broadleaf weeds that are resistant to Group 9 and 14 herbicides (Flessner et al., 2015; Spaunhorst and Bradley, 2013), but has also resulted in off‐target injury to sensitive crops. As of 15 July 2018, approximately 600 cases of dicamba injury to various crops from off‐target movement were being investigated by the state departments of agriculture (Bradley, 2018). University weed scientists estimated that approximately 445,000 ha of soybean were injured by dicamba. Soybean exposed to dicamba can exhibit moderate to severe leaf cupping and crinkling at rates as low as 1/1000th of the common use rate (Foster and Griffin, 2018). Hartzler (2017) reported that based on 1% of the labeled use rate of 560 g ha−1, soybean is 200 times more sensitive to dicamba than corn (Zea mays L.) is to glyphosate (N‐(phosphonomethyl)glycine)).Off‐target movement of dicamba can occur as vapor drift from volatility or as spray particle drift as a liquid. Volatility increases at high ambient temperature and low relative humidity (Behrens and Lueschen, 1979; Mueller et al., 2013). Volatility is also affected by herbicide formulation (Bauerle http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

Changes in Soybean Yield Components in Response to Dicamba

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Society of Agronomy
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.2134/age2019.04.0026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abbreviationsa.e.acid equivalenta.i.active ingredientDATdays after treatmentDGAdiglycolamineDMAdimethylamineLSULouisiana State UniversityOMorganic matterRecent development of dicamba (3,6‐dichloro‐2‐methoxybenzoic acid)–resistant soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] has allowed for control of broadleaf weeds that are resistant to Group 9 and 14 herbicides (Flessner et al., 2015; Spaunhorst and Bradley, 2013), but has also resulted in off‐target injury to sensitive crops. As of 15 July 2018, approximately 600 cases of dicamba injury to various crops from off‐target movement were being investigated by the state departments of agriculture (Bradley, 2018). University weed scientists estimated that approximately 445,000 ha of soybean were injured by dicamba. Soybean exposed to dicamba can exhibit moderate to severe leaf cupping and crinkling at rates as low as 1/1000th of the common use rate (Foster and Griffin, 2018). Hartzler (2017) reported that based on 1% of the labeled use rate of 560 g ha−1, soybean is 200 times more sensitive to dicamba than corn (Zea mays L.) is to glyphosate (N‐(phosphonomethyl)glycine)).Off‐target movement of dicamba can occur as vapor drift from volatility or as spray particle drift as a liquid. Volatility increases at high ambient temperature and low relative humidity (Behrens and Lueschen, 1979; Mueller et al., 2013). Volatility is also affected by herbicide formulation (Bauerle

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2019

References