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Brian Hulse and Nick Nesbitt (eds), Sounding the Virtual: Gilles Deleuze and the Theory and Philosophy of Music (Farnham: Ashgate, 2010). xvii + 288 p ...

Brian Hulse and Nick Nesbitt (eds), Sounding the Virtual: Gilles Deleuze and the Theory and... As Brian Hulse and Nick Nesbitt say in their introduction, Gilles Deleuze wrote about – or through – music a great deal, and his influence on musicians, from Brian Ferneyhough to Mouse on Mars, has been striking. Yet musicology's response has been, for the most part, muted. To be clear: it is precisely musicology which is at stake here. The disciplines of philosophy, cultural studies and comparative literature have produced a number of volumes in which the question of what a Deleuzian music – or a Deleuzian approach to music – might look like has been raised. Although three of the contributors to the present collection – Jean‐Godefroy Bidima, Sean Higgins and Nesbitt – would not be recognised (and would presumably not describe themselves) as musicologists, the other nine certainly are, ranging from (then‐) doctoral candidates (Amy Cimini and Michael Gallope) to as senior a scholar as Christopher Hasty. The case for interest from across the discipline is well made in the list of contributors alone. In any case, Hulse and Nesbitt present their contribution precisely in these terms: what can Deleuzian thought do for ‘us’ musicologists? What can ‘we’ musicologists do for Deleuzian thought? And where does http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Brian Hulse and Nick Nesbitt (eds), Sounding the Virtual: Gilles Deleuze and the Theory and Philosophy of Music (Farnham: Ashgate, 2010). xvii + 288 p ...

Music Analysis , Volume 33 (3) – Jan 1, 2014

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Music Analysis © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/musa.12026
Publisher site
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Abstract

As Brian Hulse and Nick Nesbitt say in their introduction, Gilles Deleuze wrote about – or through – music a great deal, and his influence on musicians, from Brian Ferneyhough to Mouse on Mars, has been striking. Yet musicology's response has been, for the most part, muted. To be clear: it is precisely musicology which is at stake here. The disciplines of philosophy, cultural studies and comparative literature have produced a number of volumes in which the question of what a Deleuzian music – or a Deleuzian approach to music – might look like has been raised. Although three of the contributors to the present collection – Jean‐Godefroy Bidima, Sean Higgins and Nesbitt – would not be recognised (and would presumably not describe themselves) as musicologists, the other nine certainly are, ranging from (then‐) doctoral candidates (Amy Cimini and Michael Gallope) to as senior a scholar as Christopher Hasty. The case for interest from across the discipline is well made in the list of contributors alone. In any case, Hulse and Nesbitt present their contribution precisely in these terms: what can Deleuzian thought do for ‘us’ musicologists? What can ‘we’ musicologists do for Deleuzian thought? And where does

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2014

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