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At the Borders of Musical Identity: Schenker, Corelli and the Graces

At the Borders of Musical Identity: Schenker, Corelli and the Graces OF MUSICAL IDENTITY: SCHENKER, CORELLI AND THE GRACES The first edition of Corelli’ Twelve Sonatas for Violin Op. 5 was dedicated to s Sophia Charlotte, Princess of Hanover, and the dedication is dated January 1st, 1700; it would be hard to think of a more appropriate symbol of the work’ s significance in the history of violin music. l It was engraved in the conventional format for solo sonatas, with one stave for the solo instrument and another for the basso continua. It goes without saying that the basso continua part was to be realised rather than performed literally (though how this was to be done and who it was to be done by remains a matter of some controversy).2 And equally it went without saying that the soloist should elaborate what was written in his or her part. As is well known, the slow movements of Op. 5 are little more than skeletons intended to be fleshed out by means of improvised - or at any rate improvisatory - ornamentation. Such radically free ornamentation, which at times trespasses onto what would in other countries have been seen as the domain of composition, was common practice in Italian http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

At the Borders of Musical Identity: Schenker, Corelli and the Graces

Music Analysis , Volume 18 (2) – Jul 1, 1999

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Blackwell Publishers Ltd 1999
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/1468-2249.00091
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

OF MUSICAL IDENTITY: SCHENKER, CORELLI AND THE GRACES The first edition of Corelli’ Twelve Sonatas for Violin Op. 5 was dedicated to s Sophia Charlotte, Princess of Hanover, and the dedication is dated January 1st, 1700; it would be hard to think of a more appropriate symbol of the work’ s significance in the history of violin music. l It was engraved in the conventional format for solo sonatas, with one stave for the solo instrument and another for the basso continua. It goes without saying that the basso continua part was to be realised rather than performed literally (though how this was to be done and who it was to be done by remains a matter of some controversy).2 And equally it went without saying that the soloist should elaborate what was written in his or her part. As is well known, the slow movements of Op. 5 are little more than skeletons intended to be fleshed out by means of improvised - or at any rate improvisatory - ornamentation. Such radically free ornamentation, which at times trespasses onto what would in other countries have been seen as the domain of composition, was common practice in Italian

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jul 1, 1999

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