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Assessing Nitrogen Limitation in Inoculated Soybean in Southern Brazil

Assessing Nitrogen Limitation in Inoculated Soybean in Southern Brazil AbbreviationsBNFbiological nitrogen fixationDWdry weightNdfanitrogen derived from the airSOMsoil organic matterSoybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is one of the most globally relevant field crop legume with a production of 340 million Mg in 2017–2018 (USDA, 2019). Brazil accounts for 35% (120 million Mg in 2017–2018) of the global soybean production, being the largest producer alongside the United States (USDA, 2019). As a source of protein and oil for humans and animals, soybean is a critical element for food security challenges. Increasing soybean seed yield instead of expanding hectarage is a key to attend global food demands (Fischer and Connor, 2018). Therefore, strategies to improve crop productivity at the farmer level should be further explored. Soybean yield potential is attained when a well‐adapted variety is grown under ideal conditions, without water and nutrient limitation, and in absence of abiotic (light, salinity, heat, drought) or biotic (diseases, insects, weeds) stresses (Evans, 1993).Nitrogen is one of the most important nutrients for soybean, primarily acquired via two sources: biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) and mineral N derived from soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization. As the C requirements for mineral N assimilation (4 kg C kg−1 N) is lower than BNF (6–7 kg C kg−1 N) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

Assessing Nitrogen Limitation in Inoculated Soybean in Southern Brazil

6 pages

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Society of Agronomy
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.2134/age2019.03.0016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsBNFbiological nitrogen fixationDWdry weightNdfanitrogen derived from the airSOMsoil organic matterSoybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is one of the most globally relevant field crop legume with a production of 340 million Mg in 2017–2018 (USDA, 2019). Brazil accounts for 35% (120 million Mg in 2017–2018) of the global soybean production, being the largest producer alongside the United States (USDA, 2019). As a source of protein and oil for humans and animals, soybean is a critical element for food security challenges. Increasing soybean seed yield instead of expanding hectarage is a key to attend global food demands (Fischer and Connor, 2018). Therefore, strategies to improve crop productivity at the farmer level should be further explored. Soybean yield potential is attained when a well‐adapted variety is grown under ideal conditions, without water and nutrient limitation, and in absence of abiotic (light, salinity, heat, drought) or biotic (diseases, insects, weeds) stresses (Evans, 1993).Nitrogen is one of the most important nutrients for soybean, primarily acquired via two sources: biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) and mineral N derived from soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization. As the C requirements for mineral N assimilation (4 kg C kg−1 N) is lower than BNF (6–7 kg C kg−1 N)

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2019

References