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Analysing Post‐Tonal Diatonic Music: A Modulo 7 Perspective

Analysing Post‐Tonal Diatonic Music: A Modulo 7 Perspective Music Analysis, 19/ii (2000) 167 ß Blackwell Publishers Ltd. 2000. Published by Blackwell Publishers, 108 Cowley Road, Oxford OX4 1JF, UK MATTHEW SANTA were not intended as comprehensive analyses, but merely as examples of how his theoretical model might be applied to such music.6 However, in The Harmonic Organization of `The Rite of Spring', Forte applied set theory to the analysis of an entire work, an application that was considered appropriate by some and misguided by others;7 the success of the study was the subject of a debate in this journal.8 The debate is perfectly understandable, regardless of which side of the argument one prefers. Because diatonic musical surfaces in post-tonal works are a breeding-ground for tonal allusions, they are often heard in relation to tonality. Though the work is only diatonic to a limited degree, there is enough diatonic material in The Rite to justify a dissatisfaction with any analysis of it that does not recognise the work's tonal implications. Conversely, The Rite is foreign enough to tonality to justify a dissatisfaction with any analysis that attempts to explain its pitch organisation solely in terms of functional harmony and species counterpoint. Until now, the most common response http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Analysing Post‐Tonal Diatonic Music: A Modulo 7 Perspective

Music Analysis , Volume 19 (2) – Jul 1, 2000

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/1468-2249.00116
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Music Analysis, 19/ii (2000) 167 ß Blackwell Publishers Ltd. 2000. Published by Blackwell Publishers, 108 Cowley Road, Oxford OX4 1JF, UK MATTHEW SANTA were not intended as comprehensive analyses, but merely as examples of how his theoretical model might be applied to such music.6 However, in The Harmonic Organization of `The Rite of Spring', Forte applied set theory to the analysis of an entire work, an application that was considered appropriate by some and misguided by others;7 the success of the study was the subject of a debate in this journal.8 The debate is perfectly understandable, regardless of which side of the argument one prefers. Because diatonic musical surfaces in post-tonal works are a breeding-ground for tonal allusions, they are often heard in relation to tonality. Though the work is only diatonic to a limited degree, there is enough diatonic material in The Rite to justify a dissatisfaction with any analysis of it that does not recognise the work's tonal implications. Conversely, The Rite is foreign enough to tonality to justify a dissatisfaction with any analysis that attempts to explain its pitch organisation solely in terms of functional harmony and species counterpoint. Until now, the most common response

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2000

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