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Allen Forte, The Atonal Music of Anton Webern

Allen Forte, The Atonal Music of Anton Webern ’ Music Analysis, 2l/iii (2002) 0Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2002. Published by Blackwell Publishing, 9600 Garsington Road, Oxford OX4 2DQ, UK CRITICAL FORUM Ex. 1 Forte’s analysis of Webern, Six Pieces for Large Orchestra, Op. 6 No. 6 3 z -. . Hn.3 CI. Hn. 2 Hn. 4 - -. M. CI 6-239 6-18 (5-25 (5-19 C1) CII) etc 6-239 6-18 6-219 6-18 6-219 6-18 (5-25 (5-19 (5-16 (5-19 (5-16 (5-19 CI) CII) CI) CII) CI) CII) 6-239 (5-25 CI) 6-1X 6-2196-18 6-219 6-18 (5-19 (5-16(5-19 (5-16 (5-19 CII) CI) CII) CI) CII) 6-239 (5-25 CI) = non-octatonic components (3-8 CIII) attempt to provide a rationale for pitch segmentation. The need for a perceptual basis is even more acute here than in the case of traditional set theoretic segmentation because ‘octatonicism’ is - like any generically distinctive harmonic language - something that implies perceptibility. Forte’s octatonic readings are undoubtedly at their most convincing when segmentations of the music correlate with perceptible divisions and feature usually no more than two of the collections at any one time. For the most part, however, the segmentations are counter-intuitive and the attribution of notes to particular collections is sometimes based on very small http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Allen Forte, The Atonal Music of Anton Webern

Music Analysis , Volume 21 (3) – Oct 1, 2002

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Blackwell Publishers Ltd 2002
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/1468-2249.00172
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

’ Music Analysis, 2l/iii (2002) 0Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2002. Published by Blackwell Publishing, 9600 Garsington Road, Oxford OX4 2DQ, UK CRITICAL FORUM Ex. 1 Forte’s analysis of Webern, Six Pieces for Large Orchestra, Op. 6 No. 6 3 z -. . Hn.3 CI. Hn. 2 Hn. 4 - -. M. CI 6-239 6-18 (5-25 (5-19 C1) CII) etc 6-239 6-18 6-219 6-18 6-219 6-18 (5-25 (5-19 (5-16 (5-19 (5-16 (5-19 CI) CII) CI) CII) CI) CII) 6-239 (5-25 CI) 6-1X 6-2196-18 6-219 6-18 (5-19 (5-16(5-19 (5-16 (5-19 CII) CI) CII) CI) CII) 6-239 (5-25 CI) = non-octatonic components (3-8 CIII) attempt to provide a rationale for pitch segmentation. The need for a perceptual basis is even more acute here than in the case of traditional set theoretic segmentation because ‘octatonicism’ is - like any generically distinctive harmonic language - something that implies perceptibility. Forte’s octatonic readings are undoubtedly at their most convincing when segmentations of the music correlate with perceptible divisions and feature usually no more than two of the collections at any one time. For the most part, however, the segmentations are counter-intuitive and the attribution of notes to particular collections is sometimes based on very small

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Oct 1, 2002

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