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Allen Cadwallader and David Gagné, Analysis of Tonal Music: A Schenkerian Approach

Allen Cadwallader and David Gagné, Analysis of Tonal Music: A Schenkerian Approach It would be difficult to read Cadwallader and Gagne's new Schenker textbook  without instantly drawing a comparison with Allen Forte and Steven Gilbert's Introduction to Schenkerian Analysis.1 This newer text, however, is certainly heir apparent to the field of workbooks in Schenkerian theory, for it supersedes Forte and Gilbert on many counts, not least in that it approaches the teaching of Schenkerian analysis from the `background' forwards. Written in two distinct parts, the book succinctly introduces the primary tools of Schenkerian analysis in Part One, and then applies them in Part Two, thus creating a pedagogical bridge between a basic textbook and full-scale graphic analysis. It uses clear language not only to teach students the means by which to create their own analytical graphs, but also to refer directly to Schenker's writings (a task which, to date, no other Schenker textbook has achieved quite so successfully). Part One, `Basic Principles', is broken down into the primary features of Schenkerian theory in much the same way as in Forte and Gilbert's text. There are some distinct differences between the two volumes, however, and many of these pertain not just to the effective format or presentation of material (as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Allen Cadwallader and David Gagné, Analysis of Tonal Music: A Schenkerian Approach

Music Analysis , Volume 19 (1) – Mar 1, 2000

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/1468-2249.00112
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It would be difficult to read Cadwallader and Gagne's new Schenker textbook  without instantly drawing a comparison with Allen Forte and Steven Gilbert's Introduction to Schenkerian Analysis.1 This newer text, however, is certainly heir apparent to the field of workbooks in Schenkerian theory, for it supersedes Forte and Gilbert on many counts, not least in that it approaches the teaching of Schenkerian analysis from the `background' forwards. Written in two distinct parts, the book succinctly introduces the primary tools of Schenkerian analysis in Part One, and then applies them in Part Two, thus creating a pedagogical bridge between a basic textbook and full-scale graphic analysis. It uses clear language not only to teach students the means by which to create their own analytical graphs, but also to refer directly to Schenker's writings (a task which, to date, no other Schenker textbook has achieved quite so successfully). Part One, `Basic Principles', is broken down into the primary features of Schenkerian theory in much the same way as in Forte and Gilbert's text. There are some distinct differences between the two volumes, however, and many of these pertain not just to the effective format or presentation of material (as

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2000

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