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After Relativism: Recent Directions in the High Analysis of Low Music

After Relativism: Recent Directions in the High Analysis of Low Music Readers of Music Analysis may recall that my essay ‘The High Analysis of Low Music’ set so‐called popular music in an imaginary but bitter fight to the death with so‐called contemporary classical music (Griffiths ). In the course of time, it was gratifying to find Richard Cohn ending a dictionary entry on harmony with these two sentences: Several developments in the late 20th‐century academy – notably a suspicion of historicising teleologies and the re‐evaluation of the distinction between classical and vernacular – stimulated a recognition of diatonic tonality as a living tradition. Perhaps the most important trend in practical harmony at the beginning of the 21st century is the reintroduction of contemporary music, in the form of folk music, jazz, show‐tunes, rock, and so on, into manuals of practical harmony, in both Europe and North America, in the service of compositional and improvisational as well as analytical training. (Cohn , p. 873) That shift in the word ‘contemporary’ rings true. I have served on the board of Oxford Contemporary Music since 2003 and acted as its chairman between 2006 and 2011, and ‘contemporary’ was used throughout that period to include several types of interesting music and their mixture: http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

After Relativism: Recent Directions in the High Analysis of Low Music

Music Analysis , Volume 31 (3) – Oct 1, 2012

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Music Analysis © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/musa.12005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Readers of Music Analysis may recall that my essay ‘The High Analysis of Low Music’ set so‐called popular music in an imaginary but bitter fight to the death with so‐called contemporary classical music (Griffiths ). In the course of time, it was gratifying to find Richard Cohn ending a dictionary entry on harmony with these two sentences: Several developments in the late 20th‐century academy – notably a suspicion of historicising teleologies and the re‐evaluation of the distinction between classical and vernacular – stimulated a recognition of diatonic tonality as a living tradition. Perhaps the most important trend in practical harmony at the beginning of the 21st century is the reintroduction of contemporary music, in the form of folk music, jazz, show‐tunes, rock, and so on, into manuals of practical harmony, in both Europe and North America, in the service of compositional and improvisational as well as analytical training. (Cohn , p. 873) That shift in the word ‘contemporary’ rings true. I have served on the board of Oxford Contemporary Music since 2003 and acted as its chairman between 2006 and 2011, and ‘contemporary’ was used throughout that period to include several types of interesting music and their mixture:

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Oct 1, 2012

References