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Adherence to adjuvant hormonal therapy in localised breast cancer

Adherence to adjuvant hormonal therapy in localised breast cancer INTRODUCTIONAbout three‐fourths of breast cancers express the oestrogen receptor (ER) and are dependent on the molecular function of ER as a transcription factor for their survival and proliferation. The backbone of adjuvant therapy for localised ER‐positive breast cancers consists of hormonal therapies with an oral hormonal agent (either an aromatase inhibitor or tamoxifen). These therapies when taken for 5 years post‐operatively result in significant survival benefits for ER‐positive cancer patients by reducing the risk of disease recurrence and prolong survival (ATAC Trialists' Group, 2005; Breast International Group (BIG) 1‐98 Collaborative Group et al., 2005; Swain, 2005). For post‐menopausal patients, oral hormonal treatments are currently used as mono‐therapies, while, for pre‐menopausal women, they may be combined with ovarian suppression therapy (Francis et al., 2015, 2018). Prolonged hormonal therapy of 10‐year duration is recommended for high‐risk patients (Goss et al., 2016). However, hormonal therapies are associated with a wide range of adverse effects that interfere with long‐term adherence to treatment and may even compromise benefit, if therapies are discontinued prematurely. The most common adverse effects of hormonal therapies are their menopause‐type symptoms that include hot flushes, night sweats and musculoskeletal stiffness or pains (Winer et al., 2005). A general feeling of unwellness is quite bothersome for some women http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Cancer Care Wiley

Adherence to adjuvant hormonal therapy in localised breast cancer

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0961-5423
eISSN
1365-2354
DOI
10.1111/ecc.13729
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONAbout three‐fourths of breast cancers express the oestrogen receptor (ER) and are dependent on the molecular function of ER as a transcription factor for their survival and proliferation. The backbone of adjuvant therapy for localised ER‐positive breast cancers consists of hormonal therapies with an oral hormonal agent (either an aromatase inhibitor or tamoxifen). These therapies when taken for 5 years post‐operatively result in significant survival benefits for ER‐positive cancer patients by reducing the risk of disease recurrence and prolong survival (ATAC Trialists' Group, 2005; Breast International Group (BIG) 1‐98 Collaborative Group et al., 2005; Swain, 2005). For post‐menopausal patients, oral hormonal treatments are currently used as mono‐therapies, while, for pre‐menopausal women, they may be combined with ovarian suppression therapy (Francis et al., 2015, 2018). Prolonged hormonal therapy of 10‐year duration is recommended for high‐risk patients (Goss et al., 2016). However, hormonal therapies are associated with a wide range of adverse effects that interfere with long‐term adherence to treatment and may even compromise benefit, if therapies are discontinued prematurely. The most common adverse effects of hormonal therapies are their menopause‐type symptoms that include hot flushes, night sweats and musculoskeletal stiffness or pains (Winer et al., 2005). A general feeling of unwellness is quite bothersome for some women

Journal

European Journal of Cancer CareWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2022

Keywords: adherence; aromatase inhibitors; compliance; predictive factors; tamoxifen

References