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Action experience in infancy predicts visual‐motor functional connectivity during action anticipation

Action experience in infancy predicts visual‐motor functional connectivity during action... INTRODUCTIONThe human brain undergoes significant changes during the first months of life that have long‐lasting cognitive and behavioral consequences. The development of socio‐cognitive capacities goes along with changes in the organization of functional neural networks, typically defined as groups of functionally interconnected brain regions that enable the integration of information (Friston, 2011). However, to date most of the research on social‐cognitive development in general and early action understanding more specifically has focused on identifying isolated neural markers and brain region‐specific patterns of activation (Filippi et al., 2016; Marshall et al., 2011; Meyer et al., 2019; Southgate & Vernetti, 2014). In fact, we are only at the very beginning of understanding how functional networks emerge and develop in the human brain and what factors induce changes in these networks (Gao et al., 2017). In the present study, we developed an innovative methodological approach to investigate the links between infants’ action experience and the emergence of functional neural networks involved in action prediction and perception.Action experience and sensorimotor activityAt the core of multiple theoretical approaches on action understanding is the idea that one's own action experience impacts the encoding of others’ actions (Gerson & Woodward, 2014; Hunnius & Bekkering, 2014; Meltzoff, 2007; Paulus, 2012). A http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Science Wiley

Action experience in infancy predicts visual‐motor functional connectivity during action anticipation

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
ISSN
1363-755X
eISSN
1467-7687
DOI
10.1111/desc.13339
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONThe human brain undergoes significant changes during the first months of life that have long‐lasting cognitive and behavioral consequences. The development of socio‐cognitive capacities goes along with changes in the organization of functional neural networks, typically defined as groups of functionally interconnected brain regions that enable the integration of information (Friston, 2011). However, to date most of the research on social‐cognitive development in general and early action understanding more specifically has focused on identifying isolated neural markers and brain region‐specific patterns of activation (Filippi et al., 2016; Marshall et al., 2011; Meyer et al., 2019; Southgate & Vernetti, 2014). In fact, we are only at the very beginning of understanding how functional networks emerge and develop in the human brain and what factors induce changes in these networks (Gao et al., 2017). In the present study, we developed an innovative methodological approach to investigate the links between infants’ action experience and the emergence of functional neural networks involved in action prediction and perception.Action experience and sensorimotor activityAt the core of multiple theoretical approaches on action understanding is the idea that one's own action experience impacts the encoding of others’ actions (Gerson & Woodward, 2014; Hunnius & Bekkering, 2014; Meltzoff, 2007; Paulus, 2012). A

Journal

Developmental ScienceWiley

Published: Nov 11, 2022

Keywords: alpha EEG oscillations; functional connectivity; mirroring; motor development; visuomotor connectivity; whole‐brain connectivity

References