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Accounting and Mediating: Modes, Genera, Voice‐leading and Form in Milhaud

Accounting and Mediating: Modes, Genera, Voice‐leading and Form in Milhaud in the minds of some, the days for engaging in detailed analyses of individual works are over, or at least numbered, and this may be all well and good for areas of study that enjoy a strong and varied history of analytical research, but for studies [in French music] . . . there is still a need to create a foundation on which to build. (p. ix) For me, Mawer's defensive tone is unnecessary. The question as to whether detailed engagement with the musical text remains instructive is not a matter of timeliness, or even of fashion, but one of value. Mawer tells us much that is worthwhile as she pursues her primary aim: to offer an `interpretation of pitchstructure in Milhaud's music of the 1920s' (p. ix). For the discussion which follows, I have chosen to concentrate on only a small number of the theoretical issues that she raises, and on just a few tiny examples. At some points I shall offer alternatives: not because I wish to pick holes, but rather because I feel that it is only by challenging some aspects of Mawer's fine and carefully-made interpretations that can we come to understand them better http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Accounting and Mediating: Modes, Genera, Voice‐leading and Form in Milhaud

Music Analysis , Volume 19 (2) – Jul 1, 2000

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/1468-2249.00118
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

in the minds of some, the days for engaging in detailed analyses of individual works are over, or at least numbered, and this may be all well and good for areas of study that enjoy a strong and varied history of analytical research, but for studies [in French music] . . . there is still a need to create a foundation on which to build. (p. ix) For me, Mawer's defensive tone is unnecessary. The question as to whether detailed engagement with the musical text remains instructive is not a matter of timeliness, or even of fashion, but one of value. Mawer tells us much that is worthwhile as she pursues her primary aim: to offer an `interpretation of pitchstructure in Milhaud's music of the 1920s' (p. ix). For the discussion which follows, I have chosen to concentrate on only a small number of the theoretical issues that she raises, and on just a few tiny examples. At some points I shall offer alternatives: not because I wish to pick holes, but rather because I feel that it is only by challenging some aspects of Mawer's fine and carefully-made interpretations that can we come to understand them better

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2000

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