Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Access to paediatric oncology centres in Switzerland: Disparities across rural–urban and Swiss‐foreigners cohorts

Access to paediatric oncology centres in Switzerland: Disparities across rural–urban and... INTRODUCTIONCancer is the leading disease‐related cause of death in children in the World Health Organization European region (Kyu et al., 2018). In 2020, in the European Union age‐standardised incidence rates of childhood cancer were 17.9 per 100,000 persons for boys and 16.5 for girls (European Commission, 2022). Besides disease burden, affected families continuously experience burden of treatment, for example, the disruptive effects of cancer treatment on their daily lives, working lives and social lives (Rost, Wangmo, et al., 2018). Burden of treatment is greater for families who live far from the specialised paediatric cancer centre (PCC), which are typically located in urban areas (Fluchel et al., 2014; Rost, Wangmo, et al., 2018), since given the many trips to the hospital longer travel times accumulate to a significantly higher overall expenditure of time. In a Swiss sample of 193 children who died of cancer, almost one in three had a disease duration of at least 4 years, one in four spent at least 5 months in the hospital and one in five had more than 20 inpatient stays (Rost, Wangmo, et al., 2018). This circumstance points to the need to consider the relationship between place of residence and burden of treatment.Similarly, a US‐study revealed that nearly one in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Cancer Care Wiley

Access to paediatric oncology centres in Switzerland: Disparities across rural–urban and Swiss‐foreigners cohorts

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/access-to-paediatric-oncology-centres-in-switzerland-disparities-OaY90VEPgH
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0961-5423
eISSN
1365-2354
DOI
10.1111/ecc.13679
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONCancer is the leading disease‐related cause of death in children in the World Health Organization European region (Kyu et al., 2018). In 2020, in the European Union age‐standardised incidence rates of childhood cancer were 17.9 per 100,000 persons for boys and 16.5 for girls (European Commission, 2022). Besides disease burden, affected families continuously experience burden of treatment, for example, the disruptive effects of cancer treatment on their daily lives, working lives and social lives (Rost, Wangmo, et al., 2018). Burden of treatment is greater for families who live far from the specialised paediatric cancer centre (PCC), which are typically located in urban areas (Fluchel et al., 2014; Rost, Wangmo, et al., 2018), since given the many trips to the hospital longer travel times accumulate to a significantly higher overall expenditure of time. In a Swiss sample of 193 children who died of cancer, almost one in three had a disease duration of at least 4 years, one in four spent at least 5 months in the hospital and one in five had more than 20 inpatient stays (Rost, Wangmo, et al., 2018). This circumstance points to the need to consider the relationship between place of residence and burden of treatment.Similarly, a US‐study revealed that nearly one in

Journal

European Journal of Cancer CareWiley

Published: Aug 9, 2022

Keywords: accessibility; health disparities; location‐allocation; paediatric oncology

References