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A qualitative exploration of the facilitators and barriers to early diagnosis and treatment of head and neck cancer: Perceptions of patients and carers

A qualitative exploration of the facilitators and barriers to early diagnosis and treatment of... BACKGROUNDEarly cancer diagnosis and timely commencement of quality treatment confer the best survival prospects and are central components to several national and international cancer control policies. (Neal, 2009; World Health Organisation, 2017) In Australia, there are known ‘rural–urban’ disparities in outcomes for several cancer types (Stanbury et al., 2016a; Stanbury et al., 2016b; Tervonen et al., 2017; Venchiarutti et al., 2020; Yu et al., 2017), with increasing remoteness of residence generally associated with greater risk of advanced or unknown stage at diagnosis and poorer survival outcomes. Delays in diagnosis and treatment of cancer may result in advanced disease, more aggressive and morbid treatment, poorer oncological outcomes, worse quality of life caused by treatment sequelae that may persist for years, if not permanently, after treatment completion, and in extreme cases result in incurable disease from the outset. Epidemiological studies are underway to determine whether international differences in survival outcomes may be explained by variations in pathways to diagnosis and treatment of cancer (Weller et al., 2016), and sub‐studies conducted in Australia have found that rural patients with colorectal cancer experience greater time from symptom onset to treatment compared to urban patients (Bergin et al., 2018), though breast cancer patients did not demonstrate these patterns.Head and neck cancer (HNC) is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Cancer Care Wiley

A qualitative exploration of the facilitators and barriers to early diagnosis and treatment of head and neck cancer: Perceptions of patients and carers

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0961-5423
eISSN
1365-2354
DOI
10.1111/ecc.13718
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BACKGROUNDEarly cancer diagnosis and timely commencement of quality treatment confer the best survival prospects and are central components to several national and international cancer control policies. (Neal, 2009; World Health Organisation, 2017) In Australia, there are known ‘rural–urban’ disparities in outcomes for several cancer types (Stanbury et al., 2016a; Stanbury et al., 2016b; Tervonen et al., 2017; Venchiarutti et al., 2020; Yu et al., 2017), with increasing remoteness of residence generally associated with greater risk of advanced or unknown stage at diagnosis and poorer survival outcomes. Delays in diagnosis and treatment of cancer may result in advanced disease, more aggressive and morbid treatment, poorer oncological outcomes, worse quality of life caused by treatment sequelae that may persist for years, if not permanently, after treatment completion, and in extreme cases result in incurable disease from the outset. Epidemiological studies are underway to determine whether international differences in survival outcomes may be explained by variations in pathways to diagnosis and treatment of cancer (Weller et al., 2016), and sub‐studies conducted in Australia have found that rural patients with colorectal cancer experience greater time from symptom onset to treatment compared to urban patients (Bergin et al., 2018), though breast cancer patients did not demonstrate these patterns.Head and neck cancer (HNC) is

Journal

European Journal of Cancer CareWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2022

Keywords: access to healthcare; cancer; health seeking; lived experience; qualitative; remote/rural healthcare

References