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A Note: On Informal Thinking

A Note: On Informal Thinking In his article ‘Between Hermeneutics and Formalism: the Lento of Tippett's Concerto for Orchestra (Or: Music Analysis after Lawrence Kramer)’ ( Music Analysis 30/ii–iii), David Clarke graciously thanks me for making helpful comments prior to publication. To those interested in my reaction to his critique, I would say in brief that the article is a model of fair‐minded scholarly engagement and debate. For the most part, I agree with Clarke that my work is ambivalent about the relationship between hermeneutics and analysis. Clarke and I simply assess that ambivalence differently. What he sees as a problem, I take to be a desirable necessity. It would be unrealistic to expect those who share Clarke's conviction that ‘hermeneutic acts require some stabilisation of meaning, however provisional’, to embrace my position fully. But if that position has helped give hermeneutic acts a strong claim on our musical attention, I am quite content. As Clarke observes, my thinking about this issue keeps evolving. Those inclined to continue the engagement might thus want to consider my two most recent books, Interpreting Music and Expression and Truth: On the Music of Knowledge . The latter brings to light a long‐latent involvement with Wittgenstein, who, I suppose, ruined me for life many years ago by emerging as the model of a thinker who abandons the belief in, and desire for, ‘some stabilisation of meaning’. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

A Note: On Informal Thinking

Music Analysis , Volume 31 (1) – Mar 1, 2012

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Music Analysis © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/musa.12004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In his article ‘Between Hermeneutics and Formalism: the Lento of Tippett's Concerto for Orchestra (Or: Music Analysis after Lawrence Kramer)’ ( Music Analysis 30/ii–iii), David Clarke graciously thanks me for making helpful comments prior to publication. To those interested in my reaction to his critique, I would say in brief that the article is a model of fair‐minded scholarly engagement and debate. For the most part, I agree with Clarke that my work is ambivalent about the relationship between hermeneutics and analysis. Clarke and I simply assess that ambivalence differently. What he sees as a problem, I take to be a desirable necessity. It would be unrealistic to expect those who share Clarke's conviction that ‘hermeneutic acts require some stabilisation of meaning, however provisional’, to embrace my position fully. But if that position has helped give hermeneutic acts a strong claim on our musical attention, I am quite content. As Clarke observes, my thinking about this issue keeps evolving. Those inclined to continue the engagement might thus want to consider my two most recent books, Interpreting Music and Expression and Truth: On the Music of Knowledge . The latter brings to light a long‐latent involvement with Wittgenstein, who, I suppose, ruined me for life many years ago by emerging as the model of a thinker who abandons the belief in, and desire for, ‘some stabilisation of meaning’.

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2012

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