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A low‐cost method for visible fluorescence imaging

A low‐cost method for visible fluorescence imaging A wide variety of crystallization solutions are screened to establish conditions that promote the growth of a diffraction‐quality crystal. Screening these conditions requires the assessment of many crystallization plates for the presence of crystals. Automated systems for screening and imaging are very expensive. A simple approach to imaging trace fluorescently labeled protein crystals in crystallization plates has been devised, and can be implemented at a cost as low as $50. The proteins β‐lactoglobulin B, trypsin and purified concanavalin A (ConA) were trace fluorescently labeled using three different fluorescent probes: Cascade Yellow (CY), Carboxyrhodamine 6G (CR) and Pacific Blue (PB). A crystallization screening plate was set up using β‐lactoglobulin B labeled with CR, trypsin labeled with CY, ConA labeled with each probe, and a mixture consisting of 50% PB‐labeled ConA and 50% CR‐labeled ConA. The wells of these plates were imaged using a commercially available macro‐imaging lens attachment for smart devices that have a camera. Several types of macro lens attachments were tested with smartphones and tablets. Images with the highest quality were obtained with an iPhone 6S and an AUKEY Ora 10× macro lens. Depending upon the fluorescent probe employed and its Stokes shift, a light‐emitting diode or a laser diode was used for excitation. An emission filter was used for the imaging of protein crystals labeled with CR and crystals with two‐color fluorescence. This approach can also be used with microscopy systems commonly used to observe crystallization plates. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Acta Crystallographica Section F Wiley

A low‐cost method for visible fluorescence imaging

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
2053-230X
eISSN
2053-230X
DOI
10.1107/S2053230X17015941
pmid
29199986
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A wide variety of crystallization solutions are screened to establish conditions that promote the growth of a diffraction‐quality crystal. Screening these conditions requires the assessment of many crystallization plates for the presence of crystals. Automated systems for screening and imaging are very expensive. A simple approach to imaging trace fluorescently labeled protein crystals in crystallization plates has been devised, and can be implemented at a cost as low as $50. The proteins β‐lactoglobulin B, trypsin and purified concanavalin A (ConA) were trace fluorescently labeled using three different fluorescent probes: Cascade Yellow (CY), Carboxyrhodamine 6G (CR) and Pacific Blue (PB). A crystallization screening plate was set up using β‐lactoglobulin B labeled with CR, trypsin labeled with CY, ConA labeled with each probe, and a mixture consisting of 50% PB‐labeled ConA and 50% CR‐labeled ConA. The wells of these plates were imaged using a commercially available macro‐imaging lens attachment for smart devices that have a camera. Several types of macro lens attachments were tested with smartphones and tablets. Images with the highest quality were obtained with an iPhone 6S and an AUKEY Ora 10× macro lens. Depending upon the fluorescent probe employed and its Stokes shift, a light‐emitting diode or a laser diode was used for excitation. An emission filter was used for the imaging of protein crystals labeled with CR and crystals with two‐color fluorescence. This approach can also be used with microscopy systems commonly used to observe crystallization plates.

Journal

Acta Crystallographica Section FWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2017

Keywords: ; ; ;

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