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7 Peasant Artisans: Household Prismatic Blade Production in the Zacapu Region, Michoacan (Milpillas Phase 1200–1450 AD)

7 Peasant Artisans: Household Prismatic Blade Production in the Zacapu Region, Michoacan... The increasing interest in the archaeology of craft production has provided valuable information on the social and political economies of ancient societies. A number of scholars have discussed the nature of craft specialization, the social identity of craftsmen, and the factors involved in the organization of production and its related techno‐cultural and social systems ( Brumfiel and Earle 1987 ; Costin 1991, 2001, 2007 ; Costin and Hagstrum 1995 ; Costin and Wright 1998 ). In Mesoamerica, archaeological studies have examined the context and scale of production, the level of specialization, raw material provisioning, the distribution of finished products, and the identity of the artisans ( Brumfiel 1987, 1998 ; Clark 1995, 1997 ; Clark and Bryant 1997 ; Clark and Parry 1990 ; Arnold and Santley 1993 ; Hirth 2006 ; Feinman 1999 ; Feinman and Nicholas 1993, 1995 ; Shimada 2007 ). Several of these studies explore the relationship between craft specialization, exchange, and power, emphasizing the socio‐political role played by the elites in the management of specialized activities (see among others Clark and Parry 1990 ; Clark 1987, 1995 ; Santley et al., 1986 ; Spence 1981, 1984 ; Aoyama 1999, 2004 ; Inomata 2007 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association Wiley

7 Peasant Artisans: Household Prismatic Blade Production in the Zacapu Region, Michoacan (Milpillas Phase 1200–1450 AD)

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References (27)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2009 by the American Anthropological Association
ISSN
1551-823X
eISSN
1551-8248
DOI
10.1111/j.1551-8248.2009.01015.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The increasing interest in the archaeology of craft production has provided valuable information on the social and political economies of ancient societies. A number of scholars have discussed the nature of craft specialization, the social identity of craftsmen, and the factors involved in the organization of production and its related techno‐cultural and social systems ( Brumfiel and Earle 1987 ; Costin 1991, 2001, 2007 ; Costin and Hagstrum 1995 ; Costin and Wright 1998 ). In Mesoamerica, archaeological studies have examined the context and scale of production, the level of specialization, raw material provisioning, the distribution of finished products, and the identity of the artisans ( Brumfiel 1987, 1998 ; Clark 1995, 1997 ; Clark and Bryant 1997 ; Clark and Parry 1990 ; Arnold and Santley 1993 ; Hirth 2006 ; Feinman 1999 ; Feinman and Nicholas 1993, 1995 ; Shimada 2007 ). Several of these studies explore the relationship between craft specialization, exchange, and power, emphasizing the socio‐political role played by the elites in the management of specialized activities (see among others Clark and Parry 1990 ; Clark 1987, 1995 ; Santley et al., 1986 ; Spence 1981, 1984 ; Aoyama 1999, 2004 ; Inomata 2007

Journal

Archeological Papers of the American Anthropological AssociationWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2009

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