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6 Intermittent Crafting and Multicrafting at Xochicalco

6 Intermittent Crafting and Multicrafting at Xochicalco For a long time in the history of Anthropology scholars have argued that the appearance of urban centers was an important catalyst for the development of craft specialization and other complex economic institutions like the marketplace ( Braudel 1986 ; Childe 1934 ; Durkheim 1933 ; Pirenne 1974 ; Sjoberg 1960 ; C. Smith 1976 ; Wittfogel 1957 ). While the historical circumstances behind urbanism vary, there are well documented empirical associations between the size of cities and the number, intensity, and diversity of craft and service activities found in urban centers ( Berry 1961 ; Chorley and Haggett 1967 ; Jacobs 1969 ; Ullman 1941 ). Urban craft production is often organized to fulfill the dual needs of both its resident population and the surrounding hinterland ( Appleby 1976 ; Jacobs 1969 ; Kurtz 1987 ; Trigger 1972 ). As a result urban centers are a good place to look for evidence of craft production because they often contain the greatest concentration of craft activities found in society. This study examines the structure of obsidian craft production in the prehispanic urban center of Xochicalco, Mexico ( Figure 1 ). Xochicalco was a mid‐size center of 10–15,000 persons http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association Wiley

6 Intermittent Crafting and Multicrafting at Xochicalco

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References (21)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2009 by the American Anthropological Association
ISSN
1551-823X
eISSN
1551-8248
DOI
10.1111/j.1551-8248.2009.01014.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

For a long time in the history of Anthropology scholars have argued that the appearance of urban centers was an important catalyst for the development of craft specialization and other complex economic institutions like the marketplace ( Braudel 1986 ; Childe 1934 ; Durkheim 1933 ; Pirenne 1974 ; Sjoberg 1960 ; C. Smith 1976 ; Wittfogel 1957 ). While the historical circumstances behind urbanism vary, there are well documented empirical associations between the size of cities and the number, intensity, and diversity of craft and service activities found in urban centers ( Berry 1961 ; Chorley and Haggett 1967 ; Jacobs 1969 ; Ullman 1941 ). Urban craft production is often organized to fulfill the dual needs of both its resident population and the surrounding hinterland ( Appleby 1976 ; Jacobs 1969 ; Kurtz 1987 ; Trigger 1972 ). As a result urban centers are a good place to look for evidence of craft production because they often contain the greatest concentration of craft activities found in society. This study examines the structure of obsidian craft production in the prehispanic urban center of Xochicalco, Mexico ( Figure 1 ). Xochicalco was a mid‐size center of 10–15,000 persons

Journal

Archeological Papers of the American Anthropological AssociationWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2009

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