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2 Craft Production, Household Diversification, and Domestic Economy in Prehispanic Mesoamerica

2 Craft Production, Household Diversification, and Domestic Economy in Prehispanic Mesoamerica Households are the most important social units in human society. This was emphasized in the volume's introductory essay but is worth repeating here. Households are where a society's members are born, nurtured, fed, and most often educated; in premodern societies they were where most goods were produced, pooled, and consumed. The domestic economy refers to what households do and how they were organized to meet their physical and social needs. It involves what work was done and how goods were distributed to, and consumed by household members. The domestic economy always has been the backbone of society and the development of political complexity is largely a history of how household labor, and/or the resources produced in the domestic economy, were mobilized by other institutions and the elite who supervised them ( Johnson and Earle 1987 ). Households were important and they engaged in a range of subsistence activities for the benefit of their members. Archaeologists have had a long standing interest in both households and craft production. The interest in households is due to their utility as a unit of archaeological analysis. Houses are things that archaeologists can excavate, so it is natural that the household has become http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association Wiley

2 Craft Production, Household Diversification, and Domestic Economy in Prehispanic Mesoamerica

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References (60)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2009 by the American Anthropological Association
ISSN
1551-823X
eISSN
1551-8248
DOI
10.1111/j.1551-8248.2009.01010.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Households are the most important social units in human society. This was emphasized in the volume's introductory essay but is worth repeating here. Households are where a society's members are born, nurtured, fed, and most often educated; in premodern societies they were where most goods were produced, pooled, and consumed. The domestic economy refers to what households do and how they were organized to meet their physical and social needs. It involves what work was done and how goods were distributed to, and consumed by household members. The domestic economy always has been the backbone of society and the development of political complexity is largely a history of how household labor, and/or the resources produced in the domestic economy, were mobilized by other institutions and the elite who supervised them ( Johnson and Earle 1987 ). Households were important and they engaged in a range of subsistence activities for the benefit of their members. Archaeologists have had a long standing interest in both households and craft production. The interest in households is due to their utility as a unit of archaeological analysis. Houses are things that archaeologists can excavate, so it is natural that the household has become

Journal

Archeological Papers of the American Anthropological AssociationWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2009

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