Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

TREE‐CAVITY NESTING IN BUFF‐WINGED CINCLODES (CINCLODES FUSCUS) POPULATIONS FROM NORTHWESTERN ARGENTINE PATAGONIA

TREE‐CAVITY NESTING IN BUFF‐WINGED CINCLODES (CINCLODES FUSCUS) POPULATIONS FROM NORTHWESTERN... (2016) 27: 35–46 ____________________________________________________________________________  TREE‐CAVITY  NESTING  IN  BUFF‐WINGED  CINCLODES  (CINCLODES  FUSCUS) POPULATIONS FROM NORTHWESTERN ARGENTINE PATAGONIA ____________________________________________________________________________  Valeria S. Ojeda INIBIOMA (CONICET‐Universidad Nacional del Comahue), Ecology Department‐CRUB, Quintral 1250, Bariloche, Río Negro, Argentina E‐mail: leriaojeda@gmail.com ABSTRACT  Cinclodes ovenbirds (Furnariidae) inhabit open habitats of South America, usually near water. The Buff‐ winged Cinclodes (C. fuscus) was recently recognized as a separate species, and data on its natural history are scarce. This species breeds in Patagonia and winters further north in Argentina and adjacent countries, although some popu‐ lations in Chile breed in the Andes and winter on the Pacific coast. The few nests that have been described were placed in holes on cliffs, bridges, and road cuts in open Patagonian landscapes. Based on these data, the species is considered a typical representative of the genus (i.e., open habitat, ground‐nesting ovenbird), and potential associa‐ tions with forests have not been documented. Here I report on the breeding habits of C. fuscus in native forests of northwestern Argentine Patagonia, where these birds are regular summer residents. On the course of a long‐term (1998–2016) research on the cavity‐nesting birds of north Patagonian forests, I found 51 nests in 26 nesting cavities located in large lenga (Nothofagus pumilo) trees. Most nesting cavities were reutilized in different years. No nests were found in other substrates. This is the first time that consistent tree hole‐nesting is documented for any species of Cinclodes.  Future  studies  should  determine  whether  differences  in  nesting  behavior  (ground  nesting  vs.  tree‐hole nesting)  are explained by behavioral plasticity or represent patterns of genetic differentiation between forest and steppe C. fuscus populations. RESUMEN ∙  Nidificación  en  huecos  de  árboles  por  la  Remolinera  Común  (Cinclodes  fuscus)  en  el  noroeste  de  la Patagonia Argentina Las especies del género Cinclodes (Furnariidae) son habitantes terrestres de campos abiertos de Sudamérica, general‐ mente cerca del agua. La Remolinera Común (C. fuscus) se reproduce en Patagonia y pasa el invierno más al norte en Argentina y países limítrofes, mientras que algunas poblaciones chilenas se reproducen en los Andes y en invierno descienden a la costa del Pacífico (migradores altitudinales). Cinclodes fuscus ha sido definida como especie separada de otras remolineras recientemente, y los datos sobre su historia natural son escasos. Los pocos nidos documentados se encontraban en oquedades a baja altura en acantilados, puentes y barrancos, en ambientes abiertos de Patagonia. En base a estos datos, la especie es considerada como una fiel representante del género (especie que nidifica a baja altura en áreas abiertas) y posibles asociaciones con ambientes de bosque han sido ignoradas. Aquí describo los hábi‐ tos de nidificación de C. fuscus en bosques del noroeste Patagónico (Argentina), donde la especie es residente estival. Durante un estudio de largo plazo (1998–2016) de las aves que nidifican en huecos de árboles en bosques de Patago‐ nia norte  localicé 51 nidos en 26 cavidades de grandes árboles de lenga (Nothofagus pumilio). La mayoría de las cavi‐ dades fue reutilizada en diferentes años. Ningún nido fue encontrado en sustratos de otro tipo. Esta es la primera documentación de nidificación generalizada en cavidades arbóreas de Cinclodes. Futuros estudios deberían determi‐ nar si las diferencias en hábitos reproductivos entre poblaciones de esta especie se explican sólo por una plasticidad comportamental, o representan patrones de diferenciación genética entre poblaciones de C. fuscus de bosque y de estepa. KEY WORDS  Breeding behavior ∙ Cavity‐nesting ∙ Forest ∙ Furnariidae ∙ Nothofagus ∙ Ovenbird ∙ Patagonia Received 5 October 2015 ∙ Revised 14 December 2015 ∙ Accepted 30 May 2016 ∙ Published online 13 June 2016 Communicated by Kaspar Delhey © The Neotropical Ornithological Society 35 ORNITOLOGÍA NEOTROPICAL (2016) 27: 35–46 INTRODUCTION north  along  the  Andes.  Few  nests  have  been described for Patagonia or central Chile that can be In the last decades, the phylogenetic tree of the Fur‐ assigned to C. fuscus (e.g., four nests in Narosky et al. nariidae  (ovenbirds,  treecreepers,  and  allies)  has 1983, with only one described in detail; a few nests been  under  intense  scrutiny,  and  the  high  levels  of compiled  by  Humphrey  et  al.  1970  for  Tierra  del morphological  and  behavioral  variation  in  this  large Fuego; a few others mentioned by Johnson 1967 for Neotropical family have been reinterpreted in view of Chile). Most described nests were in open Patagonian new  data  (e.g.,  Fjeldså  et  al.  2005,  Irestedt  et  al. landscapes (sometimes close to human settlements), 2006, Chesser et al. 2007, Moyle et al. 2009, Derry‐ and  consisted  of  holes  or  crevices  in  bridges,  roofs, berry et al. 2011). In parallel to the growing knowl‐ cliffs, road cuts, and ground burrows (Johnson 1967, edge  about  the  family’s  biology  and  ecology,  new Humphrey et al. 1970, Narosky et al. 1983, Christie et studies have revisited the phylogenetic relationships al. 2004), with a single mention to “hollows in logs” within the genus Cinclodes (Chesser 2004, Sanin et al. (without further details, Housse 1945). Adding to the 2009, Rader et al. 2015, Freitas et al. 2012). Its mem‐ low  number  of  reported  nests,  most  first‐hand bers  are  dull  colored  terrestrial  inhabitants  of  open descriptions  only  contained  general  information grasslands  in  South  America.  While  Cinclodes  mem‐ (substrate  and  habitat  type),  with  no  reference  to bers  are  typically  found  near  freshwater  sources, nest dimensions or other attributes.    some  species  inhabit  coastal  habitats  and  feed  on Although C. fuscus has been recorded (always at marine  resources,  which  is  possible  due  notable low densities) in association with open woodlands in adjustments  in  osmoregulatory  function  to  excrete Argentina  (e.g.,  Humphrey  et  al.  1970,  Vuilleumier salt (Sabat et al. 2006). 1985,  Christie  et  al.  2004,  Becerra  Serial  &  Grigera Among the recent taxonomic changes within the 2005, Imberti 2006) and, to a lesser extent, in Chile genus,  the  nominate  race  of  the  Bar‐winged  Cin‐ (e.g., Estades 1997), most bibliographic sources (e.g., clodes  (C.  fuscus  fuscus)  was  proposed  as  a  distinct Canevari et al. 1991, Couvé & Vidal 2003, Martínez & biological species: the Buff‐winged Cinclodes (C. fus‐ Gonzalez 2004) describe this species as an inhabitant cus), since the different subspecies hitherto included of  open  environments  such  as  rocky  terrain,  grass‐ in  C.  fuscus  do  not  constitute  a  monophyletic  clade land, hillsides, shrubbery, and steppe, usually close to (Sanín  et  al.  2009).  Cinclodes  fuscus  has  a  South water. Based on these data, C. fuscus is considered a American Cool Temperate Migration System (Joseph typical representative of the genus, i.e., an open hab‐ 1997),  breeding  in  Patagonia  (southern  Argentina itat, ground‐nesting furnarid (Collias 1997, Zyskowski and Chile) and wintering in central and northeastern & Prum 1999).  Argentina, reaching southeastern Brazil and Paraguay At the onset of a long‐term (1998–2016) research (Figure 1, Ridgely & Tudor 1994). However, this spe‐ on  the  cavity‐nesting  birds  of  north  Patagonian cies is also a year‐round resident in wetlands of Cen‐ forests, C. fuscus emerged as an unexpected member tral  Chile  (e.g.,  Simeone  et  al.  2008),  and  an of  such  breeding  bird  community.  Here  I  provide altitudinal (west‐east) migrant in and around central information  on  the  breeding  habits  of  C.  fuscus  in Chile (Housse 1945, Johnson 1967, Sabat et al. 2006, forests of NW Argentine Patagonia, mostly based on Newsome  et  al.  2015).  In  the  Cape  Horn  Biosphere the  study  on  cavity‐nesting  birds  at  the  Challhuaco Reserve (southernmost South America),  this species Valley, near the city of Bariloche. I describe the trees overwinters  by  performing  local  migrations,  moving and tree‐cavities that were used as exclusive nesting to more protected environments (low altitude ever‐ substrates  by  the  Challhuaco  population,  providing green forests), where it has been observed in search the first evidence of consistent (i.e., widespread and of  invertebrates  in  pools  and  wet  areas  under  the stable  in  time)  tree‐cavity  nesting  in  any  species  of canopy, even in the midst of the winter snow (Rozzi & Cinclodes.  Jiménez 2013). In the southern part of its distribution (i.e., Magellanic and Tierra del Fuego regions), C. fus‐ METHODS cus breeds both inland and on the coast (Humphrey et al. 1970, see reference 1 in Figure 1). It also breeds Study  area.  The  study  area  corresponds  to  the on  several  locations  near  rivers  along  the  Atlantic Andean portion of northern Patagonia, in Argentina. coast (Zapata 1967, Albrieu et al. 2004), as far north Because  of  the  rain  shadow  effect  of  the  Andes  (> as the mouth of the Negro river, where some individ‐ 2000  m  a.s.l.)  on  the  westerly  winds,  mean  annual uals may be year‐round residents (Llanos et al. 2011). precipitation declines from ca. 3000 mm at the conti‐ Breeding inland in the arid Patagonian steppe has not nental divide to less than 500 mm only 70–80 km to been  documented,  and  its  residence  there  is  ques‐ the east in the steppe. The climate of northwestern tionable (see Bettinelli & Chébez  1986, Lambertucci Argentine Patagonia is characterized by a long winter et al. 2009, Llanos et al. 2011, and especially Pruscini period of precipitation (rain and snow) and dry sum‐ et al. 2014). mers (December–March), with mean annual temper‐ Patterns of habitat use and reproduction of C. fus‐ ature  around  8°C  (Paruelo  et  al.  1998).  The  strong cus are not well known. Because of its previous sub‐ west‐to‐east decline in precipitation is paralleled by a specific status, much of the nesting data in the litera‐ vegetation  gradient,  from  humid  to  dry  forests  to ture  belong  to  other  subspecies  distributed  farther steppe.  Region  wide,  Nothofagus  (Nothofagaceae) 36 TREE‐CAVITY NESTING IN CINCLODES FUSCUS Figure 1. Distribution and known breeding locations of C. fuscus, modified from Sanin et al. 2009. The lined area represents the winter range of the south‐north migratory populations; dark area represents presumed breeding range. The asterisk shows the location of the present study, and numbers correspond to the approximate location of breeding sites from biblio‐ graphical sources or personal communications, from south to north: 1) Reynolds (1935)/Crawshay (1907)/Humphrey et al. (1970) (these sources name several localities in Tierra del Fuego, Chile and Argentina, sometimes mutually citing each other); 2) Imberti (2006) (Los Glaciares National Park, W Santa Cruz province, Argentina); 3) S Imberti pers. comm. (much of conti‐ nental southern Santa Cruz province, close to rivers); 4) Albrieu et al. (2004) (Rio Gallegos Estuary, coastal Santa Cruz, Argen‐ tina), 5) Zapata (1967) (Puerto Deseado, coastal Santa Cruz, Argentina); 6) Llanos et al. (2011) (two localities at the coast in Río Negro province, Argentina); 7) Christie et al. (2004) (Lanín and Nahuel Huapi National Parks, Andean Río Negro and Neu‐ quén provinces, Argentina); 8) JM Girini pers. comm. (Lanín National Park, Andean Neuquén province, Argentina); and 9) Goo‐ dall et al. (1957) (various localities in and around central Chile). Numbers that were placed over the sea indicate coastal nesting sites (river mouths). When more than two sources were available for the same locality, only one was depicted, to avoid overplotting. Nests described by Housse (1945) and Johnson (1967), both in Chile, lack specific geographic references and are not depicted in the map. trees  dominate  the  forests,  with  lowland  stands  of Patagonian steppe in the east), so the understory is the evergreen coihue (N. dombeyi), and pure stands open,  dominated  by  a  few  shrubs  and  herbaceous of the deciduous lenga (N. pumilio) on slopes above species.  Snow  covers  the  valley  from  late  autumn 900 m a.s.l. (June) through mid‐spring (October). Breeding  C.  fuscus  were  mainly  studied  at  the Other  lenga  forests  where  I  opportunistically Challhuaco Valley (41°15´30’’S, 71°17´50’’W), 15 km studied  nests  of  C.  fuscus  were:  Cerro  Volcánico south of Bariloche city (Figure 2) during the course of (41°15'27.14"S,  71°49'16.10"W,  1491  m  a.s.l.),  Paso a  long‐term  (1998–2016)  study  on  cavity‐nesting Puyehue  (40°43'33.54"S,  71°55'40.80"O,  1175  m birds. Challhuaco is a rugged mountainous area with a.s.l.),  trail  to  Laguna  Negra  (41°  8'32.76"S, slopes covered by pure old‐growth lenga forest that 71°33'43.02"W,  1158  m  a.s.l.),  and  Cerro  Goye occupies approximately 2400 ha (tree line at ca. 1650 (41°7'43.23"S, 71°30'36.02"W, 1445 m a.s.l.) (Figure m a.s.l.), and is contiguous  with native forests from 2). These sites are included within a square of about adjacent  valleys.  These  forests  are  located  near  the 60  x  60  km  (40°43´–41°16´S  and  71°16´–71°56´W), xeric limit of the lenga distribution (confined by the and are located inside Nahuel Huapi National Park.  37 ORNITOLOGÍA NEOTROPICAL (2016) 27: 35–46 Figure 2. Map showing locations of forest breeding sites for C. fuscus (red baloons) that were found in this study. As shown by the change in background coloration (from green to sand), the main study site (Challhuaco) lays at the transition between forests and the Patagonian arid steppe. Google Earth™ desktop 7.1.5.1557 free version was used. Data  collection.  Every  reproductive  season  during also checked for contents with the aid of a mirror and the years 1998–2016, I surveyed the valley core area flashlight. These were (1) nests below 2 m that could (ca. 1200 ha) for active nests of several cavity‐nesting be accessed without the need for tree climbing or (2) species.  Challhuaco  Valley  was  visited  for  nest nests below 5 m and close enough to vehicle roads as searches between early September and late January to carry a ladder. Sometimes, the nature of the cavity each  year,  2  days/week,  on  average.  A  network  of entrance  prevented  direct  observation  of  nest  con‐ trekking trails was used to access the different parts tents although it was possible to hear the nestlings. In of  the valley, and off‐trail searches were conducted order  to  assess  nest  contents  as  quick  as  possible ad‐libitum  in  appropriate  areas.  Sampling  effort  for (max. 5 min) to avoid disturbing the adults, climbing sites  outside  Challhuaco  cannot  be  quantified appareil  and  operations  were  not  used,  so  active because  nests  were  located  while  conducting  other nests placed 2–5 m high that were located far from unrelated activities. vehicle  roads,  and  all  active  nests  placed  over  5  m The nests of C. fuscus were located by monitoring high, were not inspected.  the  movements  of  birds  around  waterlogged  soils, I  recorded  for  all  cavities:  entrance  orientation marshes,  streams  and  lagoons  within  the  forest, (assigned  to  the  main  cardinal  points)  and  shape where  these  birds  frequently  (although  not  exclu‐ (round,  etc.),  origin  (woodpecker  or  decay),  height sively) search for food. Location and elevation of the above  ground,  and  location  on  tree  (fork,  trunk, nests  were  recorded  using  a handheld GPS  (Garmin branch). For the shape of the entrances, three cate‐ eTtrex  Legend,  and  GPSMAP  60CSx),  which  were gories  were  defined:  round  to  oval  (corresponding used to re‐locate nests later on. When an active nest to cavities left by fallen branches), oval to droplet‐like was discovered, I estimated nest development stage as  typical  for  holes  excavated  by  Magellanic  Wood‐ from the behavior of the adults. I observed the nest peckers (Campephilus magellanicus), and fissure (ver‐ entrance until witnessing the pair carrying nest mate‐ tical  cracks  of  bark  and  wood).  For  all  nest  trees,  I rial, food or fecal sacs, or taking turns at incubation recorded:  condition  (%  of  live  crown),  height,  and (as  in  Supplementary  Material).  In  addition,  about diameter  at  breast  height  (DBH).  While  the  above one  quarter  of  the  active  nests  in  Challhuaco  were characterization  was  conducted  for  all  cavities  and 38 TREE‐CAVITY NESTING IN CINCLODES FUSCUS nest trees, more detailed descriptions of the cavities in the surroundings of a permanent lagoon, but most (i.e.,  entrance  and  chamber  dimensions)  were  per‐ other nests were located > 300 m apart. The average formed  in  Challhuaco  for  nests  that  were  safely distance  to  the  closest  wetland  (snowmelt  stream, accessible. I accessed these cavities when they were pond, lagoon, etc.) was 28.8 ± 5.2 m (range: 2–78, n = no  longer  active  using  ladders  or  by  climbing  the 25), with the exception of one nest located > 100 m trees by secured free climb (static rope and climbing away  (excluded  from  the  average).  The  altitude  of equipment).  nesting  sites  ranged  between  1158–1543  m  a.s.l. An  electronic  clinometer  was  used  to  measure (1389.6 ± 22.3).  heights, a global compass for orientation, and metric tape for all other dimensions. I report the range and Nest attributes. All nests (n = 26) were found in cavi‐ means ± SE for quantitative variables.  ties due to natural decay, with one exception, located inside  a  cavity  excavated  by  the  Magellanic  Wood‐ RESULTS pecker.  This  single  case  of  a  woodpecker  hole  use was a very old and incomplete excavation (no vertical Breeding  season.  Cinclodes  fuscus  was  recorded  at chamber) that had been widened by decay. This cav‐ the  Challhuaco  forest  during  all  breeding  seasons ity was only used by a pair of C. fuscus for one season (1998–2016),  arriving  between  late  September  and (2001, successfully).  early  October  (Figures  3A  and  3B),  and  leaving  the Six  of  the  Challhuaco  cavities,  and  all  nests  out‐ area between late March and early April. Patterns of side Challhuaco, were not accessed (i.e., could not be presence‐absence  opportunistically  recorded  at examined closely)  for safety or logistic reasons. For other forests in Nahuel Huapi National Park, were in the  rest  (n  =  15),  entrances  varied  in  shape  (round, agreement with those of Challhuaco.  oval or fissure) and size (5–40 cm high), but all con‐ tained a narrow (< 7 cm wide) tunnel leading to the Territorial behavior. Soon after arrival, individuals of breeding chamber, formed by the entrance itself or C.  fuscus  engaged  in  territorial  displays  (long  trill by additional woody structures located inside (Figure while  fluttering  wings,  as  described  by  Crawshay 4A). Thus, irrespective of entrance shape and size, all 1907) performed at exposed locations like ledges on nests chambers (which were horizontal inner expan‐ standing trees, the top of snow drifts, or in the mid‐ sions, Figures 4A–F), could only be accessed through dle  of  frozen  ponds.  Pair  formation  occurred  soon narrow,  sometimes  (n  =  5)  tortuous,  passages.  The after  courtship  (November),  usually  with  both  pair average  horizontal  depth  of  nest  cavities  (the  dis‐ members  seen  arriving  at  nest  sites  carrying  nest tance from the entrance to the rear wall of the cham‐ materials.  ber)  was  29.5  ±  1.7  cm  (21–42  cm,  n  =  11;  four cavities  could  not  be  measured).  The  nest  cups Nest  sites.  Altogether  26  C.  fuscus  nest‐sites  were observed  (n  =  10)  were  rudimentary,  and  made  of located,  all  in  cavities  in  very  large  trees  (Table  1). loose grass or roots. Additional attributes of nesting Most  (24)  trees  containing  cavities  were  alive,  and holes and trees are shown in Table 1.  two  were  dead  (one  of  them  was  a  fallen  log). Twenty‐one  nest‐sites  were  located  in  Challhuaco Nest reutilization. Of the 18 nesting cavities in Chall‐ Valley while five others were opportunistically found huaco that were visited repeatedly after being found, elsewhere in Nahuel Huapi National Park. Two of the 72.2%  were  reutilized  (some  across  multiple  sea‐ latter were located during the 2012–2013 season at sons),  totalizing  46  breeding  events.  The  five  active Cerro Goye, one nest was found at Cerro Volcánico, nests  detected  elsewhere  (not  yet  visited  for  a  sec‐ one at Paso Puyehue, and the last one on the trail to ond  time)  complete  the  total  51  breeding  events Laguna  Negra,  during  the  2015–2016  breeding  sea‐ recorded for the species. son.  These  other  nest  sites  were  located  in  wood‐ lands similar in structure and composition to those in Timing  of  reproduction.  Based  on  the  46  events Challhuaco  (i.e.,  middle‐age  to  mature  continuous recorded  at  Challhuaco,  incubation  occurred  during lenga forests), except for Cerro Volcánico, where the November  (exceptionally,  in  early  December),  and forest was discontinuous and the nest was located in chick‐rearing and fledging took place in late Novem‐ one of several low (< 15 m in height) forest patches at ber  or  during  December  (exceptionally,  as  late  as the treeline surrounded by a matrix of high‐Andean early  January).  A  pair  was  once  recorded  carrying steppes and wetland meadows (locally named “mal‐ nest material in January, but their nest was deserted lin”). The lenga forest in Laguna Negra was peculiar shortly after. The dates recorded for the last breeding for containing some bamboo thickets (Chusquea sp., season  (2015–2016)  were  later  than  those  shown Poaceae) along with the same shrubs and herbaceous above, due to a notorious delay in the arrival dates of species found at the other nest‐sites. migratory species (including C. fuscus) in northwest‐ The nest‐sites in Challhuaco (n = 21) were inside ern  Patagonia,  possibly  due  to  climatic  alterations the  forest  (always  >  100  m  from  forest  edges)  and caused by El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Dur‐ dispersed across the valley (see Figures 3C and 3D for ing this last breeding season, incubation mostly took typical  forest  at  the  Challhuaco  breeding  site).  The place  during  December  (observed  in  16  nests),  and closest breeding neighbors recorded were 45 m apart chick  rearing  extended  to  early  and  mid  January 39 ORNITOLOGÍA NEOTROPICAL (2016) 27: 35–46 Figure 3. Breeding habitat of C. fuscus in the old‐growth lenga (Nothofagus pumilio) forests of Challhuaco Valley, northwes‐ tern Argentine Patagonia. A) Appearance of the Challhuaco forest (around a temporary pond) in early October (spring), when C. fuscus arrive from migration (no leaves on the trees, no herbaceous understory, some snow still covering ground). B) A C. fuscus pair foraging on the forest floor among snow patches in mid spring. C) Challhuaco landscape (valley core area, ca. 1200 ha) in January (summer). D) Summer appearance of the forest; note the old‐growth tree structure and very open understory. Photos: A, B, and C, by the author; D by M Lammertink. (observed  in  19  nests,  including  three  nest‐sites ents  remaining  in  the  surroundings  of  the  nest,  but located for the first time). not  entering  the  nest  to  incubate  or  feed  (even though  in  some  cases  they  carried  food  in  their Breeding  parameters.  Clutch  size  was  observed  for beaks).  In  those  cases  I  often  abandoned  the  site 13 nesting events (at 8 different cavities), with 2 eggs soon to reduce disturbance.  (n = 4), 3 eggs (n = 8), and 4 eggs (n = 1), respectively. However, given that these nests were not monitored Fledging  and  pre‐migratory  behavior.  Fledging  was in detail, some of these clutches may not have been not  observed  at  any  nest,  but  small  groups  of  pre‐ complete, so this information should be treated with sumably related C. fuscus were observed from Janu‐ caution.  ary  onwards  within  some  of  the  territories.  These Nestlings (2, at 7 nests; 3, at 5 nests) in different groups became larger later, at the onset of migration developmental  stages  were  observed  (12  times)  or time (4–10 individuals by April). heard  (23  times)  in  different  seasons  at  the  most accessible nests. Nestling calls were detectable once Confirmed nest failures. Although I did not monitor a  nest  was  already  known,  but  were  of  little  aid  at nests success in a systematic manner, I confirmed the locating  the  nests  since  their  calls  (whistles)  were failure of four of the five nests that were located clos‐ very soft.  est to the ground (0, 0.2, 0.8, and 1.4 m high, respec‐ tively)  in  Challhuaco.  Moreover,  three  of  the Parental  behavior.  When  the  adults  detected  the unsuccessful cavities were not reutilized by the birds presence of an observer, they became alarmed and in subsequent years, as most nests reutilized in sev‐ uttered  a  long  series  of  alarm  calls  away  from  the eral  seasons  were  placed  >  2  m  high.  The  fourth nest  (without  revealing  nest  location).  Alarm  calling unsuccessful cavity was located last season, so reuti‐ could last for long (up to 10 minutes), with the par‐ lization could not yet be checked.   40 TREE‐CAVITY NESTING IN CINCLODES FUSCUS Table  1.  Attributes  of  Buff‐winged  Cinclodes  (Cinclodes  fuscus)  nesting  cavities  and  trees  in  forests  of  Nahuel  Huapi 1  National Park, in northwestern Patagonia (Rio Negro and Neuquén provinces, Argentina).  Tree height and crown condition could  not  be  recorded  for  a  broken  trunk  (snag),  and  for  a  fallen  log.    Impossibility  to  measure  a  nest  on  a  fallen  log whose entrance looked upwards (see text for details).   Old, incomplete cavity of Magellanic Woodpecker (Campephilus magellanicus). NESTS (all breeding sites)  Mean ± SE or number of cases  Range (N)  Tree height (m)  16.2 ± 0.5  11–20 (24 )  Tree DBH (cm)  89.4 ± 5.6  48–158 (26)  Tree condition (% of live crown)  62.2 ± 2.7  40–80 (24 )  Height of nest above ground (m)  4.7 ± 0.6  0–9 (26)  Entrance orientation  E = 5    S = 3  2 (25 )  W = 7  N = 10  Nest location on tree  Trunk = 16    Branch stub or scar = 4  (26)  Roots = 2  Fork = 4  Entrance shape and cavity origin  Round‐fallen or broken branch = 18    Fissure‐broken tree =7  (26)  Oval‐woodpecker = 1   In one case, the failure was due to flooding of the DISCUSSION cavity  after  strong  rain.  This  nest  had  been  built among the roots of a large hollow lenga tree, and the Cinclodes fuscus is a regular summer resident in the entrance  was  not  completely  vertical  (somewhat forests surveyed, breeding repeatedly in tree cavities, exposed  to  weather,  Figure  4  E).  I  found  three not  necessarily  close  to  water.  The  consistent  tree drowned nestlings about a week old, and the parents hole‐nesting observed is novel for the species and the were  not  seen.  The  other  two  low  nests  were genus.  Moreover,  the  data  from  Challhuaco  (72% deserted for unknown reasons; one of them was also cavity reutilization) suggest a high nest‐site fidelity in among  roots  (at  ground  level).  I  observed  the  pair this  migratory  species;  although  birds  in  this  study carrying  food  and  heard  small  nestlings  in  late were  not  marked,  it  seems  unlikely  that  unrelated November  2006;  four  days  later,  the  nest  was individuals will use a particular cavity year after year, empty,  probably  depredated.  The  third  failed just by chance. While not previously reported for any nest  was at breast height,  in  a large hollow knot  of species of Cinclodes, the use of tree cavities has been a  standing  tree  beside  a  tourist  trail  with  much suggested  as  the  ancestral  nesting  condition  in  the trekking  activity.  I  witnessed  nest  conditioning family Furnariidae (Irestedt et al. 2006), and close rel‐ behavior  during  three  days  in  early  November atives like the woodcreepers often use cavities low in 2009,  but  the  nest  was  deserted  afterwards.  The the  trees  (Marantz  et  al.  2003).  Nevertheless  more fourth  failed  nest  was  located  in  early  December information about nest architecture in poorly known 2015,  when  two  birds  were  seen  carrying  material genera  is  needed  to  get  a  full  understanding  of  the to  a  cavity  on  the  top  side  of  a  large  fallen  tree evolution of nesting strategies in ovenbirds (Irestedt (Figures 4D and 5B). The cavity itself was horizontal, et  al.  2006)  as  well  as  on  the  adaptive  significance but  the  entrance  was  pointing  upwards.  This  was within Cinclodes. Among the Furnariidae, Cinclodes is the  only  C.  fuscus  nest  in  such  conditions  (both one of the least known groups in terms of breeding substrate  and  exposition).  The  pair  was  found  incu‐ biology  (see  Collias  1997,  Zyskowski  &  Prum  1999, bating a few days later (mid‐December), and 3 eggs Irestedt et al. 2006).  were seen at the end of a tunnel‐like cavity. The nest Cinclodes fuscus has not been considered in gen‐ was  deserted  a  week  after  incubation  was  noticed eral a tree‐cavity breeding species nor a part of forest and the nest cup was empty. A pair (most likely the bird  communities  (see  Altamirano  et  al.  2012  for same  individuals)  was  seen  in  the  vicinity.  The  fifth recent  review),  with  few  exceptions  (e.g.,  Becerra nest located low at the base of a tree (Figures 4F and Serial  &  Grigera  2005,  Imberti  2006).  I  found  these 5A)  was  presumably  successful,  as  it  was  re‐used birds breeding at low densities in the Challhuaco for‐ later. est and other forest areas surveyed in Nahuel Huapi 41 ORNITOLOGÍA NEOTROPICAL (2016) 27: 35–46 Figure 4. Schematic outlines of different C. fuscus nests recorded in lenga (Nothofagus pumilio) trees in northwestern Pata‐ gonia, Argentina. The main direction used by the adults to enter and leave the nest is represented by an arrow. Nest cup po‐ sition is shown in yellow. A) Transversal cut of a tree at the height of a nest, showing the typical tunnel‐like  entrance leading to a lateral breeding chamber containing the nest cup. B) Nest with lateral entrance placed > 2 m high in a hollowed portion of the main trunk. C) Nest with lateral entrance placed > 2 m high in a rotten branch stub. D) Nest close to ground, with upper entrance, in a fallen log. E) Nest placed very close to ground, with lateral (or almost lateral) entrance, among roots. F) Nest placed in the trunk between 1–2 m high from ground, with lateral entrance. Locations B and C were the most commonly re‐ corded in this study (about two thirds of all nests). National  Park.  The  nests  that  I  located  were  rarely Argentina), in the alpine (high altitude) forests shared close  together,  possibly  enforced  through  territorial between  Chile  and  Argentina,  and  in  the  subpolar behavior,  since  displays  and  aggressive  chases (high  latitude)  forests  typical  of  southernmost between individuals are often witnessed shortly after Patagonia (both countries). Although this species was the arrival from migration (pers. obs.). Although rep‐ also recorded in the mixed‐species matorral of north‐ resented  in  small  numbers,  C.  fuscus  has  been  also central  Chile,  its  breeding  status  there  is  uncertain recorded in the structurally reduced Magellanic sub‐ (e.g., Díaz et al. 2002 only mention the species with‐ polar forests (47°S southwards) (e.g., Humphrey et al. out referring to abundance or habitat, and Reid et al. 1970,  Clark  1986,  Imberti  2006,  Rozzi  &  Jiménez 2002 did not record the species). The association of 2013),  and  in  areas  of  open  forests  and  scrub  in C. fuscus with open forests reminds of the exclusive northern  Patagonia  (e.g.,  Vuilleumier  1985,  Estades use of Polylepis woodland and montane scrub by the 1997, Becerra Serial & Grigera 2005). However, it has endangered  Royal  Cinclodes  (C.  aricomae)  (Remsen not been recorded in the structurally diverse lowland 2003).  However,  the  latter  species  is  not  known  to forests of Chile (e.g., Willson et al. 1994, Sieving et al. nest in tree holes, instead it nests in cliff cavities or 1996, Díaz et al. 2005) nor in humid lowland forests between  large  rocks  near  the  ground  (Ávalos  & on the eastern slope of the Andes in Argentina (Ralph Gómez 2014).  1985, Vuilleumier 1985, Paritsis & Aizen 2008). Based Among  the  Austral  (i.e.,  Patagonian)  Cinclodes on data collected during my study, the forest habitat species, C. fuscus is apparently least dependent from used by this species can be described as open decidu‐ wetlands (Humphrey et al. 1970, Clark 1986, Kovacs ous  Nothofagus  forest  and  scrub.  Such  habitat  is et al. 2005, this study). The use of forests as breeding found along the ecotone between forest and steppe habitat  recorded  for  the  studied  populations  (Chall‐ (typical  “transition  forests”  on  the  Andean  slope  of huaco  and  other  sites)  is  seemingly  also  unique 42 TREE‐CAVITY NESTING IN CINCLODES FUSCUS Figure 5. Photographs of C. fuscus nests in natural cavities of lenga (Nothofagus pumilio) trees in northwestern Patagonia, Argentina. A) A successful nest with entrance located in a stem < 2 m high (white arrow), reutilized across multiple seasons. B) A nest in a fallen log (cf. Figure 4D), with a Swiss Army knife as reference. C) A pair at the entrance of a nest in a very large standing tree during an incubation switch. Photos by the author. among the Austral congeners (this study). The three nicus and C. fuscus much closer together (i.e., at the species  of  Cinclodes  that  are  sympatric  in  my  study same sites, although in different habitats) at Puyehue area do not share the same habitats. Dark‐bellied (C. and Laguna Negra forests. At both sites, permanent patagonicus)  and  Gray‐flanked  Cinclodes  (C.  ousta‐ streams  flow  across  the  lenga  forests,  which  may leti)  were  never  recorded  in  the  Challhuaco  forest allow C. patagonicus to inhabit forested stream sides. (pers. obs.). Cinclodes patagonicus was observed spo‐ These  two  species  were  also  recorded  together  in radically  along  the  main  (permanent)  stream  in  the other  forested  portions  of  north  Andean  Patagonia, Challhuaco  mid  valley  (3  km  downstream  from  the for  example  in  Lanín  National  Park,  wherever  their forest edge), and C. oustaleti was rarely recorded in respective  habitats  overlap  (JM  Girini  pers.  comm.). the broader study area (nearest observations > 20 km In  summary,  while  in  my  study  area  C.  fuscus  occu‐ away from the Challhuaco site). I recorded C. patago‐ pies forested mountain slopes between 900 m a.s.l. 43 ORNITOLOGÍA NEOTROPICAL (2016) 27: 35–46 and the treeline with relative independence of water, of intra‐specific variability in major aspects of life his‐ C. oustaleti occurs around streams in open grassy and tory  suggest  a  potentially  polytypic  species.  In  this rocky  foothills  (usually  above  the  treeline),  and  C. regard,  the  widespread  (and  exclusive)  hole‐nesting patagonicus  is  mainly  observed  along  the  shores  of in large trees for the Challhuaco population is difficult permanent water bodies at lower altitudes (Gelain et to  explain  solely  based  on  behavioral  plasticity. al. 2003, Christie et al. 2004, this study). Thus, these Instead, genetically isolated, forest‐dwelling popula‐ three species are “sympatric but not syntopic” (Rader tions of C. fuscus would be plausible and in line with et  al.  2015),  as  observed  for  Cinclodes  species  in recent  findings  for  earthcreepers  of  the  Upucerthia coastal  Chile.  These  seemingly  subtle  differences  in dumetatia‐saturatior complex, both pertaining to the habitat  use  between  sympatric  species  of  Cinclodes sister group of Cinclodes (Chesser et al. 2007). Here, may hint at the possible role of ecological specializa‐ forest‐dwelling  populations  of  the  Scale‐throated tion in the rapid adaptive divergence that has charac‐ Earthcreeper (U. dumetaria) were recently split as a terized  the  southern  members  of  the  genus. separate species, the Patagonian Forest Earthcreeper According to Sabat et al. (2006) the genus Cinclodes (U. saturatior) (Areta & Pearman 2009).  may constitute an example of a rapid adaptive radia‐ Both  possibilities,  a  high  degree  of  intra‐specific tion  with  low  levels  of  genetic  diversification  (see adaptability to live in and breed under variable habi‐ Chesser  2004).  Further  research  on  other  Cinclodes tat conditions, and the potential for more than one species focusing on a wider array of traits (migration taxon existing within C. fuscus, constitute promising and breeding ecology) may shed light on this process. research lines in the light of the data presented here. Identifying  conditions  that  favor  forest  breeding While the diversification of the genus Cinclodes con‐ in  C.  fuscus  is  important  for  both  habitat  manage‐ tinues  to  attract  attention,  the  natural  history  for ment and to better understand the life history of this many species in this group remains little explored. I little‐known species. Almost all nests were in cavities hope that the present documentation of the singular caused by natural decay in live trees that were much forest‐nesting  habits  of  some  C.  fuscus  populations larger than average, presumably among the oldest in will prompt more studies on basic life history aspects the  Challhuaco  forest.  The  nests  that  I  located  at in these furnarids, especially on those that may lead other  forest  sites  were  also  in  very  large  live  lenga to  incompatibilities  in  social  signals  and  ecology  as trees. The fact that C. fuscus hardly ever used wood‐ primary ingredients of reproductive isolation in birds pecker  cavities  for  nesting  is  probably  due  to  their (Gill 2014). need for horizontal cavities, different from the largely vertical  woodpecker  cavities.  This  implies  a  depen‐ ACKNOWLEDGMENTS dence on natural decay processes for the generation of  suitable  nesting  cavities. It  seems  that  horizontal I am grateful to S. Ippi, L. Chazarreta, G. Ortiz, and B. cavities are required as breeding sites in this species López Lanús for their help in field activities. I thank J. (as well as in other congeners) with independence of M.  Girini  and  S.  Imberti  for  sharing  their  data,  and substrate  type,  since  most  described  nests  were  in fruitful discussions. I appreciate the constructive and horizontal  burrows  of  variable  length  (e.g.,  Zapata thoughtful comments of K. Cockle and K. Delhey, as 1967, Narosky et al. 1983). Based on the nests that I their  reviews  have  been  extremely  important  to located  in  forests  of  north  Andean  Patagonia,  old‐ improve  the  manuscript.  Martín  Papalia  (Bariloche) growth  forests  with  little  understory  are  likely  the helped  with  video  footage.  The  present  study  was best woodlands in Patagonia to sustain breeding pop‐ conducted  within  the  jurisdiction  of  the  Adminis‐ ulations of C. fuscus, since these forests may provide tración  de  Parques  Nacionales  and  under  permits large  horizontal  natural  tree  cavities  for  breeding, from the Delegación Regional Patagonia.  along  with  the  openness  required  to  forage  on  the ground,  a habit  common to  most  Cinclodes  species. REFERENCES  Given that old trees and their cavities are a keystone resource undergoing major declines worldwide (Lin‐ Albrieu, C, S Imberti & S Ferrari (2004) Las aves de la Patagonia denmayer  et  al.  2013),  the  association  between  C. sur, El Estuario de Río Gallegos y zonas aledañas. Editorial fuscus and these substrates should be investigated in Univ.   Nacional  de  la  Patagonia  Austral,  Río  Gallegos, Argentina. more depth throughout its breeding range.  Altamirano, TA, JT Ibarra, F Hernández, I Rojas, J Laker & C Bona‐ My  data  together  with  published  information cic  (2012)  Hábitos  de  nidificación  de  las  aves  del  Bosque reveal high levels of intra‐specific variation in several Templado Andino de Chile. Pontificia Univ. Católica de Chile, life  history  traits  in  C.  fuscus.  Breeding  habitats  are Santiago, Chile. strikingly  diverse:  from  most  non‐forested,  open Areta, J & M Pearman (2009) Natural history, morphology, evo‐ landscapes in Patagonia to the forests reported here. lution, and taxonomic  status  of the Earthcreeper  Upucer‐ Similarly,  the  migratory  system  is  variable.  Patago‐ thia saturatior (Furnariidae) from the Patagonian forests of nian populations seemingly exhibit a normal latitudi‐ South America. Condor 111: 135–149. nal migration system (‘Austral migrant’), while in the Ávalos, V del R & MI Gómez (2014) Observations on nest site and parental  care  of  the  critically  endangered  Royal  Cinclodes central  valley  of  Chile  C.  fuscus  also  behaves  as  an (Cinclodes aricomae) in Bolivia. Ornitología Neotropical 25: altitudinal  seasonal  migrant  between  lowlands  and 477–480. hillsides (Johnson 1967, Sabat et al. 2006). Such levels 44 TREE‐CAVITY NESTING IN CINCLODES FUSCUS Becerra Serial, RM & D Grigera (2005) Dinámica estacional del Humphrey,  PS,  D  Bridge,  PW  Reynolds  &  RT  Peterson  (1970) ensamble  de  aves  de  un  bosque  norpatagónico  de  lenga Birds  of  Isla  Grande  (Tierra  del  Fuego).  Smithsonian (Nothofagus pumilio) y su relación con la disponibilidad de Manual, Smithsonian Institution, Univ. of Kansas Museum sustratos de alimentación. El Hornero 20: 131–139. of Natural History, Lawrence, Kansas, USA. Bettinelli,  MD  &  JC  Chébez  (1986)  Notas  sobre  aves  de  la Imberti, S (2006) Aves de los glaciares. Inventario ornitológico meseta  de  Somuncurá,  Río  Negro,  Argentina.  El  Hornero del Parque Nacional Los Glaciares, Santa Cruz, Patagonia, 12: 230–234. Argentina. Aves Argentinas and Administración de Parques Canevari, M, P Canevari, R Carrizo, G Harris, J Rodriguez Mata & Nacionales, Buenos Aires, Argentina. R  Straneck  (1991)  Nueva  Guía  de  las   Aves  Argentinas. Irestedt,  M,  J  Fjeldså  &  GPG  Ericson  (2006)  Evolution  of  the Tomo II. Fundación Acindar, Buenos Aires, Argentina. ovenbird‐woodcreeper  assemblage  (Aves:  Furnariidae) ‐ Chesser, RT (2004) Systematics, evolution, and biogeography of major  shifts  in  nest  architecture  and  adaptive  radiation. the  South  American  ovenbird  genus  Cinclodes.  Auk  121: Journal of Avian Biology 37: 260–272. 752–766. Johnson, WA (1967) The birds of Chile and adjacent regions of Chesser,  RT,  FK  Barker  &  RT  Brumfield  (2007)  Fourfold  poly‐ Argentina, Bolivia and Peru. Volume 2. Platt Establecimien‐ phyly  of  the  genus  formerly  known  as  Upucerthia,  with tos Gráficos S. A., Buenos Aires, Argentina. notes on  the systematics  and  evolution of the avian  sub‐ Joseph,  L  (1997)  Towards  a  broader  view  of  Neotropical family Furnariinae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution migrants:  consequences  of  a  re‐examination  of  Austral 44: 1320–1332. migration. Ornitología Neotropical 8: 31–36. Christie, MI, EJ Ramilo & M. Bettinelli (2004) Aves del noroeste Kovacs, CJ, O Kovacs, Z Kovacs & CM Kovacs (2005) Manual ilus‐ patagónico: atlas y guía. Literature of Latin America, Bue‐ trado  de  las  Aves  de  la  Patagonia.  Antártida  Argentina  e nos Aires & Sociedad Naturalista Andino Patagónica, Santa Islas  del  Atlántico  Sur.  Artes  Gráficas  Ronor  S.A.,  Buenos Fe, Argentina. Aires, Argentina. Clark, R (1986) Aves de Tierra del Fuego y Cabo de Hornos. Lit‐ Lambertucci,  SA,  F  Barbar,  C  Cabrera  &  M  Bertini  (2009) erature of Latin America, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Comentarios  sobre  las  aves  de  la  Sierra de  Pailemán,  Río Collias, NE (1997) On the origin and evolution of nest building Negro, Argentina. Nuestras Aves 54: 81–87. by passerine birds. Condor 99: 253–270. Lindenmayer, DB, WF Laurance, JF Franklin, JE Likens, SC Banks, Couvé, E & C Vidal (2003) Birds of Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego W  Blanchard,  P  Gibbons,  K  Ikin,  D  Blair,  L  McBurney,  AD &  Antarctic  Peninsula.  Fantástico  Sur  Birding  Ltda.,  Punta Manning  &  JAR  Stein  (2013)  New  policies  for  old  trees: Arenas, Chile. averting  a  global  crisis  in  a  keystone ecological  structure. Crawshay,  R  (1907)  The  birds  of  Tierra  del  Fuego.  Bernard Conservation Letters 7: 61–69. Quaritch, London, UK. Llanos,  FA,  M  Failla,  GJ  García,  PM  Giovine,  M  Carbajal,  PM Derryberry,  EP,  S  Claramunt,  G  Derryberry,  RT  Chesser,  J  Cra‐ González,  D  Paz Barreto,  P  Quillfeldt  &  JF  Masello  (2011) craft, A Aleixo, J Pérez‐Emán, JV Remsen Jr, & RT Brumfield Birds from the endangered Monte, the steppes and coastal (2011) Lineage diversification and morphological evolution biomes of the province of Río Negro, northern Patagonia, in  a  large‐scale  continental  radiation:  the  Neotropical Argentina. Checklist 7: 782–797. ovenbirds and woodcreepers (Aves: Furnariidae). Evolution Marantz,  CA,  A  Aleixo,  LR  Bevier  &  MA  Patten  (2003)  Family 65: 2973–2986. Dendrocolaptidae  (woodcreepers).  Pp  358–447  in  del Díaz,  IA,  JJ  Armesto,  S  Reid,  KE  Sieving  &  MF  Willson  (2005) Hoyo, J, A Elliott, D Christie (eds). Handbook of the Birds of Linking forest structure and composition: avian diversity in the  World.,  Volume  8:  Broadbills  to  Tapaculos.  Lynx  Edi‐ successional forests of Chiloé Island, Chile. Biological Con‐ cions, Barcelona, Spain.  servation 123: 91–101. Martínez, D & G González (2004) Las aves de Chile: nueva guía Díaz, IA, C Sarmiento, L Ulloa, R Moreira, R Navas, R Navia, E de  campo.  Ediciones  del  Naturalista,  Santiago  de  Chile, Véliz & C Peña (2002) Vertebrados terrestres de la Reserva Chile. Nacional Río Clarillo, Chile central: representatividad y con‐ Moyle, RG, RT Chesser, RT Brumfield, JG Tello, DJ Marchese & J servación. Revista Chilena de Historia Natural 75: 433–448. Cracraft  (2009)  Phylogeny  and  phylogenetic  classification Estades,  C  (1997)  Bird‐habitat  relationships  in  a  vegetational of the antbirds, ovenbirds, woodcreepers, and allies (Aves: gradient in the Andes of central Chile. Condor 99: 719–727. Passeriformes: Furnariides). Cladistics 25: 386–405. Fjeldså,  J,  M  Irestedt  &  PGP  Ericson  (2005)  Molecular  data Narosky, T, R Fraga & M de la Peña (1983) Nidificación de las reveal  some  major  adaptational  shifts  in  the  early  evolu‐ aves argentinas: (Dendrocolaptidae y Furnariidae). Asocia‐ tion of the most diverse avian family, the Furnariidae. Jour‐ ción Ornitológica del Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina. nal of Ornithology 146: 1–13. Newsome, SD, P Sabat, N Wolf, JA Rader & C Martinez del Río Freitas,  GH,  AV  Chaves, LM  Costa,  F  R  Santos  &  M  Rodrigues (2015) Multi‐tissue d2H analysis reveals altitudinal migra‐ (2012)  A  new  species  of  Cinclodes  from  the  Espinhaço tion  and  tissue‐specific  discrimination  patterns  in  Cin‐ Range, southeastern Brazil: insights into the biogeographi‐ clodes. Ecosphere 6: 1–18. cal  history  of  the  South  American  highlands.  Ibis  154: Paritsis,  J  &  MA  Aizen  (2008)  Effects  of  exotic  conifer  planta‐ 738–755. tions on the biodiversity of understory plants, epigeal bee‐ Gelain, M, L Sympson & F Vidoz (2003) Aves de Bariloche. Lista tles  and  birds  in  Nothofagus  dombeyi  forests.  Forest comentada  del  Departamento  Bariloche,  Provincia  de  Río Ecology and Management 255: 1575–1583. Negro,  Argentina.  Libros  del  Mediodía,  Buenos  Aires, Paruelo,  JM,  A  Beltrán,  E  Jobbagy,  OE  Sala  &  RA  Golluscio Argentina. (1998) The climate of Patagonia: general patterns and con‐ Gill, FB (2014) Species taxonomy of birds: which null hypothe‐ trols on biotic processes. Ecología Austral 8: 85–101. sis? Auk 116: 150–161. Pruscini, F, F Morelli, D Sisti, P Perna, A Catorci, M Bertellotti, Goodall, AF, AW Johnson & RA Philippi (1957) Las aves de Chile: MB  Luigi  Rocchi  &  R  Santolini  (2014)  Breeding  passerine su  conocimiento  y  sus  costumbres.  Tomo  I.  Platt  Estable‐ communities  in  the  Valdes  peninsula  (Patagonia,  Argen‐ cimientos Gráficos S. A., Buenos Aires, Argentina. tina). Ornitología Neotropical 25: 13–23. Housse,  RE  (1945)  Las  aves  chilenas  en  su  clasificación  mo‐ Rader, JA, ME Dillon, RT Chesser, P Sabat & C Martínez del Río derna. Su vida y sus costumbres. Ediciones de la  Univ. de (2015) Morphological divergence in a continental adaptive Chile, Santiago de Chile, Chile. adiation: South American ovenbirds of the genus Cinclodes 45 ORNITOLOGÍA NEOTROPICAL (2016) 27: 35–46        Auk 132: 180–190. Sanín,  C,  CD  Cadena,  JM  Maley,  DA  Lijtmaer,  PL  Tubaro  &  RT Ralph,  CJ  (1985)  Habitat  association  patterns  of  forest  and Chesser (2009) Paraphyly of Cinclodes fuscus (Aves: Passe‐ steppe birds of northern Patagonia, Argentina. Condor 87: riformes: Furnariidae): Implications for taxonomy and bio‐ 471–483. geography.  Molecular  Phylogenetics  and  Evolution  53: Remsen  Jr,  JV  (2003)  Family  Furnariidae  (ovenbirds).  Pp 547–555. 162–357 in del Hoyo, J, A Elliott, D Christie (eds). Handbook Sieving, KE, MF Willson & TL De Santo (1996) Habitat barriers of the Birds of the World. Volume 8: Broadbills to Tapacu‐ to  movements  of  understory  birds  in  south‐temperate los. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona, Spain. rainforests. Auk 113: 944–949. Reid, S, C Cornelius, O Barbosa, C Meynard, C Silva‐García & PA Simeone, A, E Oviedo, M Bernal & M Flores (2008) Las aves del Marquet (2002) Conservation of temperate forest birds in Humedal  de  Mantagua:  riqueza  de  especies,  amenazas  y Chile: implications from the study of an isolated forest rel‐ necesidades  de  conservación.  Boletín  Chileno  de  Orni‐ ict. Biodiversity & Conservation 11: 1975–1990. tología 14: 22–35. Ridgely, RS & G Tudor (1994) The Birds of South America. Vol‐ Vuilleumier, F (1985) Forest birds of Patagonia: ecological geog‐ ume  2:  The  suboscine  passerines.  Univ.  of  Texas  Press, raphy, speciation, endemism, and faunal history. Ornitho‐ Austin, Texas, USA. logical Monographs 36: 255–304. Rozzi,  R  &  JE  Jiménez  (eds)  (2013)  Magellanic  Sub‐Antarctic Willson, ME, TL De Santo, C Sabag & JJ Armesto (1994) Avian ornithology:  first  decade  of  long‐term  bird  studies  at  the communities of fragmented south‐temperate fainforests in Omora Ethnobotanical Park, Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve, Chile. Conservation Biology 8: 508–520. Chile. Univ. of North Texas Press, Denton, Texas, USA. Zapata,  ARP  (1967)  Observaciones  sobre  aves  de  Puerto Sabat, P, K Maldonado, M Canals & C Martinez del Rio (2006) Deseado, provincia de Santa Cruz. El Hornero 10: 351–378. Osmoregulation  and  adaptive  radiation  in  the  ovenbird Zyskowski,  K  &  RO  Prum  (1999)  Phylogenetic  analysis  of  the genus  Cinclodes  (Passeriformes:  Furnariidae).  Functional nest  architecture  of  Neotropical  ovenbirds  (Furnariidae). Ecology 20: 799–805. Auk 116: 891–911. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ornitología Neotropical Unpaywall

TREE‐CAVITY NESTING IN BUFF‐WINGED CINCLODES (CINCLODES FUSCUS) POPULATIONS FROM NORTHWESTERN ARGENTINE PATAGONIA

Ornitología NeotropicalJun 14, 2016

Loading next page...
 
/lp/unpaywall/tree-cavity-nesting-in-buff-winged-cinclodes-cinclodes-fuscus-t4FBFDLHaO

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Unpaywall
ISSN
1075-4377
DOI
10.58843/ornneo.v27i0.32
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

(2016) 27: 35–46 ____________________________________________________________________________  TREE‐CAVITY  NESTING  IN  BUFF‐WINGED  CINCLODES  (CINCLODES  FUSCUS) POPULATIONS FROM NORTHWESTERN ARGENTINE PATAGONIA ____________________________________________________________________________  Valeria S. Ojeda INIBIOMA (CONICET‐Universidad Nacional del Comahue), Ecology Department‐CRUB, Quintral 1250, Bariloche, Río Negro, Argentina E‐mail: leriaojeda@gmail.com ABSTRACT  Cinclodes ovenbirds (Furnariidae) inhabit open habitats of South America, usually near water. The Buff‐ winged Cinclodes (C. fuscus) was recently recognized as a separate species, and data on its natural history are scarce. This species breeds in Patagonia and winters further north in Argentina and adjacent countries, although some popu‐ lations in Chile breed in the Andes and winter on the Pacific coast. The few nests that have been described were placed in holes on cliffs, bridges, and road cuts in open Patagonian landscapes. Based on these data, the species is considered a typical representative of the genus (i.e., open habitat, ground‐nesting ovenbird), and potential associa‐ tions with forests have not been documented. Here I report on the breeding habits of C. fuscus in native forests of northwestern Argentine Patagonia, where these birds are regular summer residents. On the course of a long‐term (1998–2016) research on the cavity‐nesting birds of north Patagonian forests, I found 51 nests in 26 nesting cavities located in large lenga (Nothofagus pumilo) trees. Most nesting cavities were reutilized in different years. No nests were found in other substrates. This is the first time that consistent tree hole‐nesting is documented for any species of Cinclodes.  Future  studies  should  determine  whether  differences  in  nesting  behavior  (ground  nesting  vs.  tree‐hole nesting)  are explained by behavioral plasticity or represent patterns of genetic differentiation between forest and steppe C. fuscus populations. RESUMEN ∙  Nidificación  en  huecos  de  árboles  por  la  Remolinera  Común  (Cinclodes  fuscus)  en  el  noroeste  de  la Patagonia Argentina Las especies del género Cinclodes (Furnariidae) son habitantes terrestres de campos abiertos de Sudamérica, general‐ mente cerca del agua. La Remolinera Común (C. fuscus) se reproduce en Patagonia y pasa el invierno más al norte en Argentina y países limítrofes, mientras que algunas poblaciones chilenas se reproducen en los Andes y en invierno descienden a la costa del Pacífico (migradores altitudinales). Cinclodes fuscus ha sido definida como especie separada de otras remolineras recientemente, y los datos sobre su historia natural son escasos. Los pocos nidos documentados se encontraban en oquedades a baja altura en acantilados, puentes y barrancos, en ambientes abiertos de Patagonia. En base a estos datos, la especie es considerada como una fiel representante del género (especie que nidifica a baja altura en áreas abiertas) y posibles asociaciones con ambientes de bosque han sido ignoradas. Aquí describo los hábi‐ tos de nidificación de C. fuscus en bosques del noroeste Patagónico (Argentina), donde la especie es residente estival. Durante un estudio de largo plazo (1998–2016) de las aves que nidifican en huecos de árboles en bosques de Patago‐ nia norte  localicé 51 nidos en 26 cavidades de grandes árboles de lenga (Nothofagus pumilio). La mayoría de las cavi‐ dades fue reutilizada en diferentes años. Ningún nido fue encontrado en sustratos de otro tipo. Esta es la primera documentación de nidificación generalizada en cavidades arbóreas de Cinclodes. Futuros estudios deberían determi‐ nar si las diferencias en hábitos reproductivos entre poblaciones de esta especie se explican sólo por una plasticidad comportamental, o representan patrones de diferenciación genética entre poblaciones de C. fuscus de bosque y de estepa. KEY WORDS  Breeding behavior ∙ Cavity‐nesting ∙ Forest ∙ Furnariidae ∙ Nothofagus ∙ Ovenbird ∙ Patagonia Received 5 October 2015 ∙ Revised 14 December 2015 ∙ Accepted 30 May 2016 ∙ Published online 13 June 2016 Communicated by Kaspar Delhey © The Neotropical Ornithological Society 35 ORNITOLOGÍA NEOTROPICAL (2016) 27: 35–46 INTRODUCTION north  along  the  Andes.  Few  nests  have  been described for Patagonia or central Chile that can be In the last decades, the phylogenetic tree of the Fur‐ assigned to C. fuscus (e.g., four nests in Narosky et al. nariidae  (ovenbirds,  treecreepers,  and  allies)  has 1983, with only one described in detail; a few nests been  under  intense  scrutiny,  and  the  high  levels  of compiled  by  Humphrey  et  al.  1970  for  Tierra  del morphological  and  behavioral  variation  in  this  large Fuego; a few others mentioned by Johnson 1967 for Neotropical family have been reinterpreted in view of Chile). Most described nests were in open Patagonian new  data  (e.g.,  Fjeldså  et  al.  2005,  Irestedt  et  al. landscapes (sometimes close to human settlements), 2006, Chesser et al. 2007, Moyle et al. 2009, Derry‐ and  consisted  of  holes  or  crevices  in  bridges,  roofs, berry et al. 2011). In parallel to the growing knowl‐ cliffs, road cuts, and ground burrows (Johnson 1967, edge  about  the  family’s  biology  and  ecology,  new Humphrey et al. 1970, Narosky et al. 1983, Christie et studies have revisited the phylogenetic relationships al. 2004), with a single mention to “hollows in logs” within the genus Cinclodes (Chesser 2004, Sanin et al. (without further details, Housse 1945). Adding to the 2009, Rader et al. 2015, Freitas et al. 2012). Its mem‐ low  number  of  reported  nests,  most  first‐hand bers  are  dull  colored  terrestrial  inhabitants  of  open descriptions  only  contained  general  information grasslands  in  South  America.  While  Cinclodes  mem‐ (substrate  and  habitat  type),  with  no  reference  to bers  are  typically  found  near  freshwater  sources, nest dimensions or other attributes.    some  species  inhabit  coastal  habitats  and  feed  on Although C. fuscus has been recorded (always at marine  resources,  which  is  possible  due  notable low densities) in association with open woodlands in adjustments  in  osmoregulatory  function  to  excrete Argentina  (e.g.,  Humphrey  et  al.  1970,  Vuilleumier salt (Sabat et al. 2006). 1985,  Christie  et  al.  2004,  Becerra  Serial  &  Grigera Among the recent taxonomic changes within the 2005, Imberti 2006) and, to a lesser extent, in Chile genus,  the  nominate  race  of  the  Bar‐winged  Cin‐ (e.g., Estades 1997), most bibliographic sources (e.g., clodes  (C.  fuscus  fuscus)  was  proposed  as  a  distinct Canevari et al. 1991, Couvé & Vidal 2003, Martínez & biological species: the Buff‐winged Cinclodes (C. fus‐ Gonzalez 2004) describe this species as an inhabitant cus), since the different subspecies hitherto included of  open  environments  such  as  rocky  terrain,  grass‐ in  C.  fuscus  do  not  constitute  a  monophyletic  clade land, hillsides, shrubbery, and steppe, usually close to (Sanín  et  al.  2009).  Cinclodes  fuscus  has  a  South water. Based on these data, C. fuscus is considered a American Cool Temperate Migration System (Joseph typical representative of the genus, i.e., an open hab‐ 1997),  breeding  in  Patagonia  (southern  Argentina itat, ground‐nesting furnarid (Collias 1997, Zyskowski and Chile) and wintering in central and northeastern & Prum 1999).  Argentina, reaching southeastern Brazil and Paraguay At the onset of a long‐term (1998–2016) research (Figure 1, Ridgely & Tudor 1994). However, this spe‐ on  the  cavity‐nesting  birds  of  north  Patagonian cies is also a year‐round resident in wetlands of Cen‐ forests, C. fuscus emerged as an unexpected member tral  Chile  (e.g.,  Simeone  et  al.  2008),  and  an of  such  breeding  bird  community.  Here  I  provide altitudinal (west‐east) migrant in and around central information  on  the  breeding  habits  of  C.  fuscus  in Chile (Housse 1945, Johnson 1967, Sabat et al. 2006, forests of NW Argentine Patagonia, mostly based on Newsome  et  al.  2015).  In  the  Cape  Horn  Biosphere the  study  on  cavity‐nesting  birds  at  the  Challhuaco Reserve (southernmost South America),  this species Valley, near the city of Bariloche. I describe the trees overwinters  by  performing  local  migrations,  moving and tree‐cavities that were used as exclusive nesting to more protected environments (low altitude ever‐ substrates  by  the  Challhuaco  population,  providing green forests), where it has been observed in search the first evidence of consistent (i.e., widespread and of  invertebrates  in  pools  and  wet  areas  under  the stable  in  time)  tree‐cavity  nesting  in  any  species  of canopy, even in the midst of the winter snow (Rozzi & Cinclodes.  Jiménez 2013). In the southern part of its distribution (i.e., Magellanic and Tierra del Fuego regions), C. fus‐ METHODS cus breeds both inland and on the coast (Humphrey et al. 1970, see reference 1 in Figure 1). It also breeds Study  area.  The  study  area  corresponds  to  the on  several  locations  near  rivers  along  the  Atlantic Andean portion of northern Patagonia, in Argentina. coast (Zapata 1967, Albrieu et al. 2004), as far north Because  of  the  rain  shadow  effect  of  the  Andes  (> as the mouth of the Negro river, where some individ‐ 2000  m  a.s.l.)  on  the  westerly  winds,  mean  annual uals may be year‐round residents (Llanos et al. 2011). precipitation declines from ca. 3000 mm at the conti‐ Breeding inland in the arid Patagonian steppe has not nental divide to less than 500 mm only 70–80 km to been  documented,  and  its  residence  there  is  ques‐ the east in the steppe. The climate of northwestern tionable (see Bettinelli & Chébez  1986, Lambertucci Argentine Patagonia is characterized by a long winter et al. 2009, Llanos et al. 2011, and especially Pruscini period of precipitation (rain and snow) and dry sum‐ et al. 2014). mers (December–March), with mean annual temper‐ Patterns of habitat use and reproduction of C. fus‐ ature  around  8°C  (Paruelo  et  al.  1998).  The  strong cus are not well known. Because of its previous sub‐ west‐to‐east decline in precipitation is paralleled by a specific status, much of the nesting data in the litera‐ vegetation  gradient,  from  humid  to  dry  forests  to ture  belong  to  other  subspecies  distributed  farther steppe.  Region  wide,  Nothofagus  (Nothofagaceae) 36 TREE‐CAVITY NESTING IN CINCLODES FUSCUS Figure 1. Distribution and known breeding locations of C. fuscus, modified from Sanin et al. 2009. The lined area represents the winter range of the south‐north migratory populations; dark area represents presumed breeding range. The asterisk shows the location of the present study, and numbers correspond to the approximate location of breeding sites from biblio‐ graphical sources or personal communications, from south to north: 1) Reynolds (1935)/Crawshay (1907)/Humphrey et al. (1970) (these sources name several localities in Tierra del Fuego, Chile and Argentina, sometimes mutually citing each other); 2) Imberti (2006) (Los Glaciares National Park, W Santa Cruz province, Argentina); 3) S Imberti pers. comm. (much of conti‐ nental southern Santa Cruz province, close to rivers); 4) Albrieu et al. (2004) (Rio Gallegos Estuary, coastal Santa Cruz, Argen‐ tina), 5) Zapata (1967) (Puerto Deseado, coastal Santa Cruz, Argentina); 6) Llanos et al. (2011) (two localities at the coast in Río Negro province, Argentina); 7) Christie et al. (2004) (Lanín and Nahuel Huapi National Parks, Andean Río Negro and Neu‐ quén provinces, Argentina); 8) JM Girini pers. comm. (Lanín National Park, Andean Neuquén province, Argentina); and 9) Goo‐ dall et al. (1957) (various localities in and around central Chile). Numbers that were placed over the sea indicate coastal nesting sites (river mouths). When more than two sources were available for the same locality, only one was depicted, to avoid overplotting. Nests described by Housse (1945) and Johnson (1967), both in Chile, lack specific geographic references and are not depicted in the map. trees  dominate  the  forests,  with  lowland  stands  of Patagonian steppe in the east), so the understory is the evergreen coihue (N. dombeyi), and pure stands open,  dominated  by  a  few  shrubs  and  herbaceous of the deciduous lenga (N. pumilio) on slopes above species.  Snow  covers  the  valley  from  late  autumn 900 m a.s.l. (June) through mid‐spring (October). Breeding  C.  fuscus  were  mainly  studied  at  the Other  lenga  forests  where  I  opportunistically Challhuaco Valley (41°15´30’’S, 71°17´50’’W), 15 km studied  nests  of  C.  fuscus  were:  Cerro  Volcánico south of Bariloche city (Figure 2) during the course of (41°15'27.14"S,  71°49'16.10"W,  1491  m  a.s.l.),  Paso a  long‐term  (1998–2016)  study  on  cavity‐nesting Puyehue  (40°43'33.54"S,  71°55'40.80"O,  1175  m birds. Challhuaco is a rugged mountainous area with a.s.l.),  trail  to  Laguna  Negra  (41°  8'32.76"S, slopes covered by pure old‐growth lenga forest that 71°33'43.02"W,  1158  m  a.s.l.),  and  Cerro  Goye occupies approximately 2400 ha (tree line at ca. 1650 (41°7'43.23"S, 71°30'36.02"W, 1445 m a.s.l.) (Figure m a.s.l.), and is contiguous  with native forests from 2). These sites are included within a square of about adjacent  valleys.  These  forests  are  located  near  the 60  x  60  km  (40°43´–41°16´S  and  71°16´–71°56´W), xeric limit of the lenga distribution (confined by the and are located inside Nahuel Huapi National Park.  37 ORNITOLOGÍA NEOTROPICAL (2016) 27: 35–46 Figure 2. Map showing locations of forest breeding sites for C. fuscus (red baloons) that were found in this study. As shown by the change in background coloration (from green to sand), the main study site (Challhuaco) lays at the transition between forests and the Patagonian arid steppe. Google Earth™ desktop 7.1.5.1557 free version was used. Data  collection.  Every  reproductive  season  during also checked for contents with the aid of a mirror and the years 1998–2016, I surveyed the valley core area flashlight. These were (1) nests below 2 m that could (ca. 1200 ha) for active nests of several cavity‐nesting be accessed without the need for tree climbing or (2) species.  Challhuaco  Valley  was  visited  for  nest nests below 5 m and close enough to vehicle roads as searches between early September and late January to carry a ladder. Sometimes, the nature of the cavity each  year,  2  days/week,  on  average.  A  network  of entrance  prevented  direct  observation  of  nest  con‐ trekking trails was used to access the different parts tents although it was possible to hear the nestlings. In of  the valley, and off‐trail searches were conducted order  to  assess  nest  contents  as  quick  as  possible ad‐libitum  in  appropriate  areas.  Sampling  effort  for (max. 5 min) to avoid disturbing the adults, climbing sites  outside  Challhuaco  cannot  be  quantified appareil  and  operations  were  not  used,  so  active because  nests  were  located  while  conducting  other nests placed 2–5 m high that were located far from unrelated activities. vehicle  roads,  and  all  active  nests  placed  over  5  m The nests of C. fuscus were located by monitoring high, were not inspected.  the  movements  of  birds  around  waterlogged  soils, I  recorded  for  all  cavities:  entrance  orientation marshes,  streams  and  lagoons  within  the  forest, (assigned  to  the  main  cardinal  points)  and  shape where  these  birds  frequently  (although  not  exclu‐ (round,  etc.),  origin  (woodpecker  or  decay),  height sively) search for food. Location and elevation of the above  ground,  and  location  on  tree  (fork,  trunk, nests  were  recorded  using  a handheld GPS  (Garmin branch). For the shape of the entrances, three cate‐ eTtrex  Legend,  and  GPSMAP  60CSx),  which  were gories  were  defined:  round  to  oval  (corresponding used to re‐locate nests later on. When an active nest to cavities left by fallen branches), oval to droplet‐like was discovered, I estimated nest development stage as  typical  for  holes  excavated  by  Magellanic  Wood‐ from the behavior of the adults. I observed the nest peckers (Campephilus magellanicus), and fissure (ver‐ entrance until witnessing the pair carrying nest mate‐ tical  cracks  of  bark  and  wood).  For  all  nest  trees,  I rial, food or fecal sacs, or taking turns at incubation recorded:  condition  (%  of  live  crown),  height,  and (as  in  Supplementary  Material).  In  addition,  about diameter  at  breast  height  (DBH).  While  the  above one  quarter  of  the  active  nests  in  Challhuaco  were characterization  was  conducted  for  all  cavities  and 38 TREE‐CAVITY NESTING IN CINCLODES FUSCUS nest trees, more detailed descriptions of the cavities in the surroundings of a permanent lagoon, but most (i.e.,  entrance  and  chamber  dimensions)  were  per‐ other nests were located > 300 m apart. The average formed  in  Challhuaco  for  nests  that  were  safely distance  to  the  closest  wetland  (snowmelt  stream, accessible. I accessed these cavities when they were pond, lagoon, etc.) was 28.8 ± 5.2 m (range: 2–78, n = no  longer  active  using  ladders  or  by  climbing  the 25), with the exception of one nest located > 100 m trees by secured free climb (static rope and climbing away  (excluded  from  the  average).  The  altitude  of equipment).  nesting  sites  ranged  between  1158–1543  m  a.s.l. An  electronic  clinometer  was  used  to  measure (1389.6 ± 22.3).  heights, a global compass for orientation, and metric tape for all other dimensions. I report the range and Nest attributes. All nests (n = 26) were found in cavi‐ means ± SE for quantitative variables.  ties due to natural decay, with one exception, located inside  a  cavity  excavated  by  the  Magellanic  Wood‐ RESULTS pecker.  This  single  case  of  a  woodpecker  hole  use was a very old and incomplete excavation (no vertical Breeding  season.  Cinclodes  fuscus  was  recorded  at chamber) that had been widened by decay. This cav‐ the  Challhuaco  forest  during  all  breeding  seasons ity was only used by a pair of C. fuscus for one season (1998–2016),  arriving  between  late  September  and (2001, successfully).  early  October  (Figures  3A  and  3B),  and  leaving  the Six  of  the  Challhuaco  cavities,  and  all  nests  out‐ area between late March and early April. Patterns of side Challhuaco, were not accessed (i.e., could not be presence‐absence  opportunistically  recorded  at examined closely)  for safety or logistic reasons. For other forests in Nahuel Huapi National Park, were in the  rest  (n  =  15),  entrances  varied  in  shape  (round, agreement with those of Challhuaco.  oval or fissure) and size (5–40 cm high), but all con‐ tained a narrow (< 7 cm wide) tunnel leading to the Territorial behavior. Soon after arrival, individuals of breeding chamber, formed by the entrance itself or C.  fuscus  engaged  in  territorial  displays  (long  trill by additional woody structures located inside (Figure while  fluttering  wings,  as  described  by  Crawshay 4A). Thus, irrespective of entrance shape and size, all 1907) performed at exposed locations like ledges on nests chambers (which were horizontal inner expan‐ standing trees, the top of snow drifts, or in the mid‐ sions, Figures 4A–F), could only be accessed through dle  of  frozen  ponds.  Pair  formation  occurred  soon narrow,  sometimes  (n  =  5)  tortuous,  passages.  The after  courtship  (November),  usually  with  both  pair average  horizontal  depth  of  nest  cavities  (the  dis‐ members  seen  arriving  at  nest  sites  carrying  nest tance from the entrance to the rear wall of the cham‐ materials.  ber)  was  29.5  ±  1.7  cm  (21–42  cm,  n  =  11;  four cavities  could  not  be  measured).  The  nest  cups Nest  sites.  Altogether  26  C.  fuscus  nest‐sites  were observed  (n  =  10)  were  rudimentary,  and  made  of located,  all  in  cavities  in  very  large  trees  (Table  1). loose grass or roots. Additional attributes of nesting Most  (24)  trees  containing  cavities  were  alive,  and holes and trees are shown in Table 1.  two  were  dead  (one  of  them  was  a  fallen  log). Twenty‐one  nest‐sites  were  located  in  Challhuaco Nest reutilization. Of the 18 nesting cavities in Chall‐ Valley while five others were opportunistically found huaco that were visited repeatedly after being found, elsewhere in Nahuel Huapi National Park. Two of the 72.2%  were  reutilized  (some  across  multiple  sea‐ latter were located during the 2012–2013 season at sons),  totalizing  46  breeding  events.  The  five  active Cerro Goye, one nest was found at Cerro Volcánico, nests  detected  elsewhere  (not  yet  visited  for  a  sec‐ one at Paso Puyehue, and the last one on the trail to ond  time)  complete  the  total  51  breeding  events Laguna  Negra,  during  the  2015–2016  breeding  sea‐ recorded for the species. son.  These  other  nest  sites  were  located  in  wood‐ lands similar in structure and composition to those in Timing  of  reproduction.  Based  on  the  46  events Challhuaco  (i.e.,  middle‐age  to  mature  continuous recorded  at  Challhuaco,  incubation  occurred  during lenga forests), except for Cerro Volcánico, where the November  (exceptionally,  in  early  December),  and forest was discontinuous and the nest was located in chick‐rearing and fledging took place in late Novem‐ one of several low (< 15 m in height) forest patches at ber  or  during  December  (exceptionally,  as  late  as the treeline surrounded by a matrix of high‐Andean early  January).  A  pair  was  once  recorded  carrying steppes and wetland meadows (locally named “mal‐ nest material in January, but their nest was deserted lin”). The lenga forest in Laguna Negra was peculiar shortly after. The dates recorded for the last breeding for containing some bamboo thickets (Chusquea sp., season  (2015–2016)  were  later  than  those  shown Poaceae) along with the same shrubs and herbaceous above, due to a notorious delay in the arrival dates of species found at the other nest‐sites. migratory species (including C. fuscus) in northwest‐ The nest‐sites in Challhuaco (n = 21) were inside ern  Patagonia,  possibly  due  to  climatic  alterations the  forest  (always  >  100  m  from  forest  edges)  and caused by El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Dur‐ dispersed across the valley (see Figures 3C and 3D for ing this last breeding season, incubation mostly took typical  forest  at  the  Challhuaco  breeding  site).  The place  during  December  (observed  in  16  nests),  and closest breeding neighbors recorded were 45 m apart chick  rearing  extended  to  early  and  mid  January 39 ORNITOLOGÍA NEOTROPICAL (2016) 27: 35–46 Figure 3. Breeding habitat of C. fuscus in the old‐growth lenga (Nothofagus pumilio) forests of Challhuaco Valley, northwes‐ tern Argentine Patagonia. A) Appearance of the Challhuaco forest (around a temporary pond) in early October (spring), when C. fuscus arrive from migration (no leaves on the trees, no herbaceous understory, some snow still covering ground). B) A C. fuscus pair foraging on the forest floor among snow patches in mid spring. C) Challhuaco landscape (valley core area, ca. 1200 ha) in January (summer). D) Summer appearance of the forest; note the old‐growth tree structure and very open understory. Photos: A, B, and C, by the author; D by M Lammertink. (observed  in  19  nests,  including  three  nest‐sites ents  remaining  in  the  surroundings  of  the  nest,  but located for the first time). not  entering  the  nest  to  incubate  or  feed  (even though  in  some  cases  they  carried  food  in  their Breeding  parameters.  Clutch  size  was  observed  for beaks).  In  those  cases  I  often  abandoned  the  site 13 nesting events (at 8 different cavities), with 2 eggs soon to reduce disturbance.  (n = 4), 3 eggs (n = 8), and 4 eggs (n = 1), respectively. However, given that these nests were not monitored Fledging  and  pre‐migratory  behavior.  Fledging  was in detail, some of these clutches may not have been not  observed  at  any  nest,  but  small  groups  of  pre‐ complete, so this information should be treated with sumably related C. fuscus were observed from Janu‐ caution.  ary  onwards  within  some  of  the  territories.  These Nestlings (2, at 7 nests; 3, at 5 nests) in different groups became larger later, at the onset of migration developmental  stages  were  observed  (12  times)  or time (4–10 individuals by April). heard  (23  times)  in  different  seasons  at  the  most accessible nests. Nestling calls were detectable once Confirmed nest failures. Although I did not monitor a  nest  was  already  known,  but  were  of  little  aid  at nests success in a systematic manner, I confirmed the locating  the  nests  since  their  calls  (whistles)  were failure of four of the five nests that were located clos‐ very soft.  est to the ground (0, 0.2, 0.8, and 1.4 m high, respec‐ tively)  in  Challhuaco.  Moreover,  three  of  the Parental  behavior.  When  the  adults  detected  the unsuccessful cavities were not reutilized by the birds presence of an observer, they became alarmed and in subsequent years, as most nests reutilized in sev‐ uttered  a  long  series  of  alarm  calls  away  from  the eral  seasons  were  placed  >  2  m  high.  The  fourth nest  (without  revealing  nest  location).  Alarm  calling unsuccessful cavity was located last season, so reuti‐ could last for long (up to 10 minutes), with the par‐ lization could not yet be checked.   40 TREE‐CAVITY NESTING IN CINCLODES FUSCUS Table  1.  Attributes  of  Buff‐winged  Cinclodes  (Cinclodes  fuscus)  nesting  cavities  and  trees  in  forests  of  Nahuel  Huapi 1  National Park, in northwestern Patagonia (Rio Negro and Neuquén provinces, Argentina).  Tree height and crown condition could  not  be  recorded  for  a  broken  trunk  (snag),  and  for  a  fallen  log.    Impossibility  to  measure  a  nest  on  a  fallen  log whose entrance looked upwards (see text for details).   Old, incomplete cavity of Magellanic Woodpecker (Campephilus magellanicus). NESTS (all breeding sites)  Mean ± SE or number of cases  Range (N)  Tree height (m)  16.2 ± 0.5  11–20 (24 )  Tree DBH (cm)  89.4 ± 5.6  48–158 (26)  Tree condition (% of live crown)  62.2 ± 2.7  40–80 (24 )  Height of nest above ground (m)  4.7 ± 0.6  0–9 (26)  Entrance orientation  E = 5    S = 3  2 (25 )  W = 7  N = 10  Nest location on tree  Trunk = 16    Branch stub or scar = 4  (26)  Roots = 2  Fork = 4  Entrance shape and cavity origin  Round‐fallen or broken branch = 18    Fissure‐broken tree =7  (26)  Oval‐woodpecker = 1   In one case, the failure was due to flooding of the DISCUSSION cavity  after  strong  rain.  This  nest  had  been  built among the roots of a large hollow lenga tree, and the Cinclodes fuscus is a regular summer resident in the entrance  was  not  completely  vertical  (somewhat forests surveyed, breeding repeatedly in tree cavities, exposed  to  weather,  Figure  4  E).  I  found  three not  necessarily  close  to  water.  The  consistent  tree drowned nestlings about a week old, and the parents hole‐nesting observed is novel for the species and the were  not  seen.  The  other  two  low  nests  were genus.  Moreover,  the  data  from  Challhuaco  (72% deserted for unknown reasons; one of them was also cavity reutilization) suggest a high nest‐site fidelity in among  roots  (at  ground  level).  I  observed  the  pair this  migratory  species;  although  birds  in  this  study carrying  food  and  heard  small  nestlings  in  late were  not  marked,  it  seems  unlikely  that  unrelated November  2006;  four  days  later,  the  nest  was individuals will use a particular cavity year after year, empty,  probably  depredated.  The  third  failed just by chance. While not previously reported for any nest  was at breast height,  in  a large hollow knot  of species of Cinclodes, the use of tree cavities has been a  standing  tree  beside  a  tourist  trail  with  much suggested  as  the  ancestral  nesting  condition  in  the trekking  activity.  I  witnessed  nest  conditioning family Furnariidae (Irestedt et al. 2006), and close rel‐ behavior  during  three  days  in  early  November atives like the woodcreepers often use cavities low in 2009,  but  the  nest  was  deserted  afterwards.  The the  trees  (Marantz  et  al.  2003).  Nevertheless  more fourth  failed  nest  was  located  in  early  December information about nest architecture in poorly known 2015,  when  two  birds  were  seen  carrying  material genera  is  needed  to  get  a  full  understanding  of  the to  a  cavity  on  the  top  side  of  a  large  fallen  tree evolution of nesting strategies in ovenbirds (Irestedt (Figures 4D and 5B). The cavity itself was horizontal, et  al.  2006)  as  well  as  on  the  adaptive  significance but  the  entrance  was  pointing  upwards.  This  was within Cinclodes. Among the Furnariidae, Cinclodes is the  only  C.  fuscus  nest  in  such  conditions  (both one of the least known groups in terms of breeding substrate  and  exposition).  The  pair  was  found  incu‐ biology  (see  Collias  1997,  Zyskowski  &  Prum  1999, bating a few days later (mid‐December), and 3 eggs Irestedt et al. 2006).  were seen at the end of a tunnel‐like cavity. The nest Cinclodes fuscus has not been considered in gen‐ was  deserted  a  week  after  incubation  was  noticed eral a tree‐cavity breeding species nor a part of forest and the nest cup was empty. A pair (most likely the bird  communities  (see  Altamirano  et  al.  2012  for same  individuals)  was  seen  in  the  vicinity.  The  fifth recent  review),  with  few  exceptions  (e.g.,  Becerra nest located low at the base of a tree (Figures 4F and Serial  &  Grigera  2005,  Imberti  2006).  I  found  these 5A)  was  presumably  successful,  as  it  was  re‐used birds breeding at low densities in the Challhuaco for‐ later. est and other forest areas surveyed in Nahuel Huapi 41 ORNITOLOGÍA NEOTROPICAL (2016) 27: 35–46 Figure 4. Schematic outlines of different C. fuscus nests recorded in lenga (Nothofagus pumilio) trees in northwestern Pata‐ gonia, Argentina. The main direction used by the adults to enter and leave the nest is represented by an arrow. Nest cup po‐ sition is shown in yellow. A) Transversal cut of a tree at the height of a nest, showing the typical tunnel‐like  entrance leading to a lateral breeding chamber containing the nest cup. B) Nest with lateral entrance placed > 2 m high in a hollowed portion of the main trunk. C) Nest with lateral entrance placed > 2 m high in a rotten branch stub. D) Nest close to ground, with upper entrance, in a fallen log. E) Nest placed very close to ground, with lateral (or almost lateral) entrance, among roots. F) Nest placed in the trunk between 1–2 m high from ground, with lateral entrance. Locations B and C were the most commonly re‐ corded in this study (about two thirds of all nests). National  Park.  The  nests  that  I  located  were  rarely Argentina), in the alpine (high altitude) forests shared close  together,  possibly  enforced  through  territorial between  Chile  and  Argentina,  and  in  the  subpolar behavior,  since  displays  and  aggressive  chases (high  latitude)  forests  typical  of  southernmost between individuals are often witnessed shortly after Patagonia (both countries). Although this species was the arrival from migration (pers. obs.). Although rep‐ also recorded in the mixed‐species matorral of north‐ resented  in  small  numbers,  C.  fuscus  has  been  also central  Chile,  its  breeding  status  there  is  uncertain recorded in the structurally reduced Magellanic sub‐ (e.g., Díaz et al. 2002 only mention the species with‐ polar forests (47°S southwards) (e.g., Humphrey et al. out referring to abundance or habitat, and Reid et al. 1970,  Clark  1986,  Imberti  2006,  Rozzi  &  Jiménez 2002 did not record the species). The association of 2013),  and  in  areas  of  open  forests  and  scrub  in C. fuscus with open forests reminds of the exclusive northern  Patagonia  (e.g.,  Vuilleumier  1985,  Estades use of Polylepis woodland and montane scrub by the 1997, Becerra Serial & Grigera 2005). However, it has endangered  Royal  Cinclodes  (C.  aricomae)  (Remsen not been recorded in the structurally diverse lowland 2003).  However,  the  latter  species  is  not  known  to forests of Chile (e.g., Willson et al. 1994, Sieving et al. nest in tree holes, instead it nests in cliff cavities or 1996, Díaz et al. 2005) nor in humid lowland forests between  large  rocks  near  the  ground  (Ávalos  & on the eastern slope of the Andes in Argentina (Ralph Gómez 2014).  1985, Vuilleumier 1985, Paritsis & Aizen 2008). Based Among  the  Austral  (i.e.,  Patagonian)  Cinclodes on data collected during my study, the forest habitat species, C. fuscus is apparently least dependent from used by this species can be described as open decidu‐ wetlands (Humphrey et al. 1970, Clark 1986, Kovacs ous  Nothofagus  forest  and  scrub.  Such  habitat  is et al. 2005, this study). The use of forests as breeding found along the ecotone between forest and steppe habitat  recorded  for  the  studied  populations  (Chall‐ (typical  “transition  forests”  on  the  Andean  slope  of huaco  and  other  sites)  is  seemingly  also  unique 42 TREE‐CAVITY NESTING IN CINCLODES FUSCUS Figure 5. Photographs of C. fuscus nests in natural cavities of lenga (Nothofagus pumilio) trees in northwestern Patagonia, Argentina. A) A successful nest with entrance located in a stem < 2 m high (white arrow), reutilized across multiple seasons. B) A nest in a fallen log (cf. Figure 4D), with a Swiss Army knife as reference. C) A pair at the entrance of a nest in a very large standing tree during an incubation switch. Photos by the author. among the Austral congeners (this study). The three nicus and C. fuscus much closer together (i.e., at the species  of  Cinclodes  that  are  sympatric  in  my  study same sites, although in different habitats) at Puyehue area do not share the same habitats. Dark‐bellied (C. and Laguna Negra forests. At both sites, permanent patagonicus)  and  Gray‐flanked  Cinclodes  (C.  ousta‐ streams  flow  across  the  lenga  forests,  which  may leti)  were  never  recorded  in  the  Challhuaco  forest allow C. patagonicus to inhabit forested stream sides. (pers. obs.). Cinclodes patagonicus was observed spo‐ These  two  species  were  also  recorded  together  in radically  along  the  main  (permanent)  stream  in  the other  forested  portions  of  north  Andean  Patagonia, Challhuaco  mid  valley  (3  km  downstream  from  the for  example  in  Lanín  National  Park,  wherever  their forest edge), and C. oustaleti was rarely recorded in respective  habitats  overlap  (JM  Girini  pers.  comm.). the broader study area (nearest observations > 20 km In  summary,  while  in  my  study  area  C.  fuscus  occu‐ away from the Challhuaco site). I recorded C. patago‐ pies forested mountain slopes between 900 m a.s.l. 43 ORNITOLOGÍA NEOTROPICAL (2016) 27: 35–46 and the treeline with relative independence of water, of intra‐specific variability in major aspects of life his‐ C. oustaleti occurs around streams in open grassy and tory  suggest  a  potentially  polytypic  species.  In  this rocky  foothills  (usually  above  the  treeline),  and  C. regard,  the  widespread  (and  exclusive)  hole‐nesting patagonicus  is  mainly  observed  along  the  shores  of in large trees for the Challhuaco population is difficult permanent water bodies at lower altitudes (Gelain et to  explain  solely  based  on  behavioral  plasticity. al. 2003, Christie et al. 2004, this study). Thus, these Instead, genetically isolated, forest‐dwelling popula‐ three species are “sympatric but not syntopic” (Rader tions of C. fuscus would be plausible and in line with et  al.  2015),  as  observed  for  Cinclodes  species  in recent  findings  for  earthcreepers  of  the  Upucerthia coastal  Chile.  These  seemingly  subtle  differences  in dumetatia‐saturatior complex, both pertaining to the habitat  use  between  sympatric  species  of  Cinclodes sister group of Cinclodes (Chesser et al. 2007). Here, may hint at the possible role of ecological specializa‐ forest‐dwelling  populations  of  the  Scale‐throated tion in the rapid adaptive divergence that has charac‐ Earthcreeper (U. dumetaria) were recently split as a terized  the  southern  members  of  the  genus. separate species, the Patagonian Forest Earthcreeper According to Sabat et al. (2006) the genus Cinclodes (U. saturatior) (Areta & Pearman 2009).  may constitute an example of a rapid adaptive radia‐ Both  possibilities,  a  high  degree  of  intra‐specific tion  with  low  levels  of  genetic  diversification  (see adaptability to live in and breed under variable habi‐ Chesser  2004).  Further  research  on  other  Cinclodes tat conditions, and the potential for more than one species focusing on a wider array of traits (migration taxon existing within C. fuscus, constitute promising and breeding ecology) may shed light on this process. research lines in the light of the data presented here. Identifying  conditions  that  favor  forest  breeding While the diversification of the genus Cinclodes con‐ in  C.  fuscus  is  important  for  both  habitat  manage‐ tinues  to  attract  attention,  the  natural  history  for ment and to better understand the life history of this many species in this group remains little explored. I little‐known species. Almost all nests were in cavities hope that the present documentation of the singular caused by natural decay in live trees that were much forest‐nesting  habits  of  some  C.  fuscus  populations larger than average, presumably among the oldest in will prompt more studies on basic life history aspects the  Challhuaco  forest.  The  nests  that  I  located  at in these furnarids, especially on those that may lead other  forest  sites  were  also  in  very  large  live  lenga to  incompatibilities  in  social  signals  and  ecology  as trees. The fact that C. fuscus hardly ever used wood‐ primary ingredients of reproductive isolation in birds pecker  cavities  for  nesting  is  probably  due  to  their (Gill 2014). need for horizontal cavities, different from the largely vertical  woodpecker  cavities.  This  implies  a  depen‐ ACKNOWLEDGMENTS dence on natural decay processes for the generation of  suitable  nesting  cavities. It  seems  that  horizontal I am grateful to S. Ippi, L. Chazarreta, G. Ortiz, and B. cavities are required as breeding sites in this species López Lanús for their help in field activities. I thank J. (as well as in other congeners) with independence of M.  Girini  and  S.  Imberti  for  sharing  their  data,  and substrate  type,  since  most  described  nests  were  in fruitful discussions. I appreciate the constructive and horizontal  burrows  of  variable  length  (e.g.,  Zapata thoughtful comments of K. Cockle and K. Delhey, as 1967, Narosky et al. 1983). Based on the nests that I their  reviews  have  been  extremely  important  to located  in  forests  of  north  Andean  Patagonia,  old‐ improve  the  manuscript.  Martín  Papalia  (Bariloche) growth  forests  with  little  understory  are  likely  the helped  with  video  footage.  The  present  study  was best woodlands in Patagonia to sustain breeding pop‐ conducted  within  the  jurisdiction  of  the  Adminis‐ ulations of C. fuscus, since these forests may provide tración  de  Parques  Nacionales  and  under  permits large  horizontal  natural  tree  cavities  for  breeding, from the Delegación Regional Patagonia.  along  with  the  openness  required  to  forage  on  the ground,  a habit  common to  most  Cinclodes  species. REFERENCES  Given that old trees and their cavities are a keystone resource undergoing major declines worldwide (Lin‐ Albrieu, C, S Imberti & S Ferrari (2004) Las aves de la Patagonia denmayer  et  al.  2013),  the  association  between  C. sur, El Estuario de Río Gallegos y zonas aledañas. Editorial fuscus and these substrates should be investigated in Univ.   Nacional  de  la  Patagonia  Austral,  Río  Gallegos, Argentina. more depth throughout its breeding range.  Altamirano, TA, JT Ibarra, F Hernández, I Rojas, J Laker & C Bona‐ My  data  together  with  published  information cic  (2012)  Hábitos  de  nidificación  de  las  aves  del  Bosque reveal high levels of intra‐specific variation in several Templado Andino de Chile. Pontificia Univ. Católica de Chile, life  history  traits  in  C.  fuscus.  Breeding  habitats  are Santiago, Chile. strikingly  diverse:  from  most  non‐forested,  open Areta, J & M Pearman (2009) Natural history, morphology, evo‐ landscapes in Patagonia to the forests reported here. lution, and taxonomic  status  of the Earthcreeper  Upucer‐ Similarly,  the  migratory  system  is  variable.  Patago‐ thia saturatior (Furnariidae) from the Patagonian forests of nian populations seemingly exhibit a normal latitudi‐ South America. Condor 111: 135–149. nal migration system (‘Austral migrant’), while in the Ávalos, V del R & MI Gómez (2014) Observations on nest site and parental  care  of  the  critically  endangered  Royal  Cinclodes central  valley  of  Chile  C.  fuscus  also  behaves  as  an (Cinclodes aricomae) in Bolivia. Ornitología Neotropical 25: altitudinal  seasonal  migrant  between  lowlands  and 477–480. hillsides (Johnson 1967, Sabat et al. 2006). Such levels 44 TREE‐CAVITY NESTING IN CINCLODES FUSCUS Becerra Serial, RM & D Grigera (2005) Dinámica estacional del Humphrey,  PS,  D  Bridge,  PW  Reynolds  &  RT  Peterson  (1970) ensamble  de  aves  de  un  bosque  norpatagónico  de  lenga Birds  of  Isla  Grande  (Tierra  del  Fuego).  Smithsonian (Nothofagus pumilio) y su relación con la disponibilidad de Manual, Smithsonian Institution, Univ. of Kansas Museum sustratos de alimentación. El Hornero 20: 131–139. of Natural History, Lawrence, Kansas, USA. Bettinelli,  MD  &  JC  Chébez  (1986)  Notas  sobre  aves  de  la Imberti, S (2006) Aves de los glaciares. Inventario ornitológico meseta  de  Somuncurá,  Río  Negro,  Argentina.  El  Hornero del Parque Nacional Los Glaciares, Santa Cruz, Patagonia, 12: 230–234. Argentina. Aves Argentinas and Administración de Parques Canevari, M, P Canevari, R Carrizo, G Harris, J Rodriguez Mata & Nacionales, Buenos Aires, Argentina. R  Straneck  (1991)  Nueva  Guía  de  las   Aves  Argentinas. Irestedt,  M,  J  Fjeldså  &  GPG  Ericson  (2006)  Evolution  of  the Tomo II. Fundación Acindar, Buenos Aires, Argentina. ovenbird‐woodcreeper  assemblage  (Aves:  Furnariidae) ‐ Chesser, RT (2004) Systematics, evolution, and biogeography of major  shifts  in  nest  architecture  and  adaptive  radiation. the  South  American  ovenbird  genus  Cinclodes.  Auk  121: Journal of Avian Biology 37: 260–272. 752–766. Johnson, WA (1967) The birds of Chile and adjacent regions of Chesser,  RT,  FK  Barker  &  RT  Brumfield  (2007)  Fourfold  poly‐ Argentina, Bolivia and Peru. Volume 2. Platt Establecimien‐ phyly  of  the  genus  formerly  known  as  Upucerthia,  with tos Gráficos S. A., Buenos Aires, Argentina. notes on  the systematics  and  evolution of the avian  sub‐ Joseph,  L  (1997)  Towards  a  broader  view  of  Neotropical family Furnariinae. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution migrants:  consequences  of  a  re‐examination  of  Austral 44: 1320–1332. migration. Ornitología Neotropical 8: 31–36. Christie, MI, EJ Ramilo & M. Bettinelli (2004) Aves del noroeste Kovacs, CJ, O Kovacs, Z Kovacs & CM Kovacs (2005) Manual ilus‐ patagónico: atlas y guía. Literature of Latin America, Bue‐ trado  de  las  Aves  de  la  Patagonia.  Antártida  Argentina  e nos Aires & Sociedad Naturalista Andino Patagónica, Santa Islas  del  Atlántico  Sur.  Artes  Gráficas  Ronor  S.A.,  Buenos Fe, Argentina. Aires, Argentina. Clark, R (1986) Aves de Tierra del Fuego y Cabo de Hornos. Lit‐ Lambertucci,  SA,  F  Barbar,  C  Cabrera  &  M  Bertini  (2009) erature of Latin America, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Comentarios  sobre  las  aves  de  la  Sierra de  Pailemán,  Río Collias, NE (1997) On the origin and evolution of nest building Negro, Argentina. Nuestras Aves 54: 81–87. by passerine birds. Condor 99: 253–270. Lindenmayer, DB, WF Laurance, JF Franklin, JE Likens, SC Banks, Couvé, E & C Vidal (2003) Birds of Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego W  Blanchard,  P  Gibbons,  K  Ikin,  D  Blair,  L  McBurney,  AD &  Antarctic  Peninsula.  Fantástico  Sur  Birding  Ltda.,  Punta Manning  &  JAR  Stein  (2013)  New  policies  for  old  trees: Arenas, Chile. averting  a  global  crisis  in  a  keystone ecological  structure. Crawshay,  R  (1907)  The  birds  of  Tierra  del  Fuego.  Bernard Conservation Letters 7: 61–69. Quaritch, London, UK. Llanos,  FA,  M  Failla,  GJ  García,  PM  Giovine,  M  Carbajal,  PM Derryberry,  EP,  S  Claramunt,  G  Derryberry,  RT  Chesser,  J  Cra‐ González,  D  Paz Barreto,  P  Quillfeldt  &  JF  Masello  (2011) craft, A Aleixo, J Pérez‐Emán, JV Remsen Jr, & RT Brumfield Birds from the endangered Monte, the steppes and coastal (2011) Lineage diversification and morphological evolution biomes of the province of Río Negro, northern Patagonia, in  a  large‐scale  continental  radiation:  the  Neotropical Argentina. Checklist 7: 782–797. ovenbirds and woodcreepers (Aves: Furnariidae). Evolution Marantz,  CA,  A  Aleixo,  LR  Bevier  &  MA  Patten  (2003)  Family 65: 2973–2986. Dendrocolaptidae  (woodcreepers).  Pp  358–447  in  del Díaz,  IA,  JJ  Armesto,  S  Reid,  KE  Sieving  &  MF  Willson  (2005) Hoyo, J, A Elliott, D Christie (eds). Handbook of the Birds of Linking forest structure and composition: avian diversity in the  World.,  Volume  8:  Broadbills  to  Tapaculos.  Lynx  Edi‐ successional forests of Chiloé Island, Chile. Biological Con‐ cions, Barcelona, Spain.  servation 123: 91–101. Martínez, D & G González (2004) Las aves de Chile: nueva guía Díaz, IA, C Sarmiento, L Ulloa, R Moreira, R Navas, R Navia, E de  campo.  Ediciones  del  Naturalista,  Santiago  de  Chile, Véliz & C Peña (2002) Vertebrados terrestres de la Reserva Chile. Nacional Río Clarillo, Chile central: representatividad y con‐ Moyle, RG, RT Chesser, RT Brumfield, JG Tello, DJ Marchese & J servación. Revista Chilena de Historia Natural 75: 433–448. Cracraft  (2009)  Phylogeny  and  phylogenetic  classification Estades,  C  (1997)  Bird‐habitat  relationships  in  a  vegetational of the antbirds, ovenbirds, woodcreepers, and allies (Aves: gradient in the Andes of central Chile. Condor 99: 719–727. Passeriformes: Furnariides). Cladistics 25: 386–405. Fjeldså,  J,  M  Irestedt  &  PGP  Ericson  (2005)  Molecular  data Narosky, T, R Fraga & M de la Peña (1983) Nidificación de las reveal  some  major  adaptational  shifts  in  the  early  evolu‐ aves argentinas: (Dendrocolaptidae y Furnariidae). Asocia‐ tion of the most diverse avian family, the Furnariidae. Jour‐ ción Ornitológica del Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina. nal of Ornithology 146: 1–13. Newsome, SD, P Sabat, N Wolf, JA Rader & C Martinez del Río Freitas,  GH,  AV  Chaves, LM  Costa,  F  R  Santos  &  M  Rodrigues (2015) Multi‐tissue d2H analysis reveals altitudinal migra‐ (2012)  A  new  species  of  Cinclodes  from  the  Espinhaço tion  and  tissue‐specific  discrimination  patterns  in  Cin‐ Range, southeastern Brazil: insights into the biogeographi‐ clodes. Ecosphere 6: 1–18. cal  history  of  the  South  American  highlands.  Ibis  154: Paritsis,  J  &  MA  Aizen  (2008)  Effects  of  exotic  conifer  planta‐ 738–755. tions on the biodiversity of understory plants, epigeal bee‐ Gelain, M, L Sympson & F Vidoz (2003) Aves de Bariloche. Lista tles  and  birds  in  Nothofagus  dombeyi  forests.  Forest comentada  del  Departamento  Bariloche,  Provincia  de  Río Ecology and Management 255: 1575–1583. Negro,  Argentina.  Libros  del  Mediodía,  Buenos  Aires, Paruelo,  JM,  A  Beltrán,  E  Jobbagy,  OE  Sala  &  RA  Golluscio Argentina. (1998) The climate of Patagonia: general patterns and con‐ Gill, FB (2014) Species taxonomy of birds: which null hypothe‐ trols on biotic processes. Ecología Austral 8: 85–101. sis? Auk 116: 150–161. Pruscini, F, F Morelli, D Sisti, P Perna, A Catorci, M Bertellotti, Goodall, AF, AW Johnson & RA Philippi (1957) Las aves de Chile: MB  Luigi  Rocchi  &  R  Santolini  (2014)  Breeding  passerine su  conocimiento  y  sus  costumbres.  Tomo  I.  Platt  Estable‐ communities  in  the  Valdes  peninsula  (Patagonia,  Argen‐ cimientos Gráficos S. A., Buenos Aires, Argentina. tina). Ornitología Neotropical 25: 13–23. Housse,  RE  (1945)  Las  aves  chilenas  en  su  clasificación  mo‐ Rader, JA, ME Dillon, RT Chesser, P Sabat & C Martínez del Río derna. Su vida y sus costumbres. Ediciones de la  Univ. de (2015) Morphological divergence in a continental adaptive Chile, Santiago de Chile, Chile. adiation: South American ovenbirds of the genus Cinclodes 45 ORNITOLOGÍA NEOTROPICAL (2016) 27: 35–46        Auk 132: 180–190. Sanín,  C,  CD  Cadena,  JM  Maley,  DA  Lijtmaer,  PL  Tubaro  &  RT Ralph,  CJ  (1985)  Habitat  association  patterns  of  forest  and Chesser (2009) Paraphyly of Cinclodes fuscus (Aves: Passe‐ steppe birds of northern Patagonia, Argentina. Condor 87: riformes: Furnariidae): Implications for taxonomy and bio‐ 471–483. geography.  Molecular  Phylogenetics  and  Evolution  53: Remsen  Jr,  JV  (2003)  Family  Furnariidae  (ovenbirds).  Pp 547–555. 162–357 in del Hoyo, J, A Elliott, D Christie (eds). Handbook Sieving, KE, MF Willson & TL De Santo (1996) Habitat barriers of the Birds of the World. Volume 8: Broadbills to Tapacu‐ to  movements  of  understory  birds  in  south‐temperate los. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona, Spain. rainforests. Auk 113: 944–949. Reid, S, C Cornelius, O Barbosa, C Meynard, C Silva‐García & PA Simeone, A, E Oviedo, M Bernal & M Flores (2008) Las aves del Marquet (2002) Conservation of temperate forest birds in Humedal  de  Mantagua:  riqueza  de  especies,  amenazas  y Chile: implications from the study of an isolated forest rel‐ necesidades  de  conservación.  Boletín  Chileno  de  Orni‐ ict. Biodiversity & Conservation 11: 1975–1990. tología 14: 22–35. Ridgely, RS & G Tudor (1994) The Birds of South America. Vol‐ Vuilleumier, F (1985) Forest birds of Patagonia: ecological geog‐ ume  2:  The  suboscine  passerines.  Univ.  of  Texas  Press, raphy, speciation, endemism, and faunal history. Ornitho‐ Austin, Texas, USA. logical Monographs 36: 255–304. Rozzi,  R  &  JE  Jiménez  (eds)  (2013)  Magellanic  Sub‐Antarctic Willson, ME, TL De Santo, C Sabag & JJ Armesto (1994) Avian ornithology:  first  decade  of  long‐term  bird  studies  at  the communities of fragmented south‐temperate fainforests in Omora Ethnobotanical Park, Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve, Chile. Conservation Biology 8: 508–520. Chile. Univ. of North Texas Press, Denton, Texas, USA. Zapata,  ARP  (1967)  Observaciones  sobre  aves  de  Puerto Sabat, P, K Maldonado, M Canals & C Martinez del Rio (2006) Deseado, provincia de Santa Cruz. El Hornero 10: 351–378. Osmoregulation  and  adaptive  radiation  in  the  ovenbird Zyskowski,  K  &  RO  Prum  (1999)  Phylogenetic  analysis  of  the genus  Cinclodes  (Passeriformes:  Furnariidae).  Functional nest  architecture  of  Neotropical  ovenbirds  (Furnariidae). Ecology 20: 799–805. Auk 116: 891–911.

Journal

Ornitología NeotropicalUnpaywall

Published: Jun 14, 2016

There are no references for this article.