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Aves, Apodiformes, Trochilidae, Topaza pella (Linnaeus, 1758): a range reinforcement in Amazonian Brazil

Aves, Apodiformes, Trochilidae, Topaza pella (Linnaeus, 1758): a range reinforcement in Amazonian... ISSN 1809-127X (online edition) © 2010 Check List and Authors Chec List Open Access | Freely available at www.checklist.org.br Journal of species lists and distribution Aves, Apodiformes, Trochilidae, Topaza pella (Linnaeus, 1758): A range reinforcement in io ri Amazonian Brazil ap 1* 2 Bradley J.W. Davis and Scott T. Olmstead o 1 Rua São Cosme e Damião, 247, Caixa Postal 481. CEP 78580-000. Alta Floresta, MT, Brazil. 2 Tropical Birding, Felix Oralabal N45-55 y Joaquín Paredes, Edificio Espinosa piso 3. Quito, Ecuador. * Corresponding author e-mail: sclateria@yahoo.ca te Abstract: We present new distribution records for Topaza pella (Linnaeus, 1758) in the southern reaches of the Amazon Basin in Brazil. The two new localities presented for the species elucidate its range in southern Pará and northern Mato Grosso states, and in consideration of recent records elsewhere south of the Amazon River, suggest that the species is widely distributed across suitable habitat throughout the Brazilian Amazon. The Topaza hummingbirds are amongst the largest are consistent with other published observations of the members of the family, occupying lowland forests of genus from Brazil (e.g. Peres and Whittaker 1991; Stotz northern Amazonia and the Guianan Shield where they et al. 1997; Henriques et al. 2003). BJWD made field apparently prefer the canopy and edge of forests on sandy recordings of the species’ characteristic loud vocalizations soils, particularly along narrow blackwater streams and during both initial encounters with the species using a elsewhere near water (Schuchmann 1999; Ridgely et al. Sennheiser ME-67 shotgun microphone and a Marantz 2005). Hu et al. (2000) defined the known range limits for PMD-660 digital field recorder. These recordings will the Topaza hummingbirds and mapped the occurrence of be archived at the INPA Bird Collection in Manaus and Topaza pella (Linnaeus, 1758) across SE Venezuela and truncated cuts are also available at an online open-access the Guianas, as well as from the central Brazilian Amazon resource (www.xeno-canto.org). in the state of Amazonas east to northwestern Pará state In return visits to the São Benedito II River in October at the mouth of the Amazon River, in addition to a single 2007 and during week-long visits in each of the months of isolated locality in eastern Rondônia state. Subsequent May, June, July and November 2008, and also in February, fieldwork in the eastern Amazon basin has confirmed the May, September and October 2009, BJWD found T. pella to presence of T. pella in the Tapajós National Forest near be fairly common in the area. Multiple individuals could Santarém, Pará (Henriques et al. 2003), Caxiaunã National typically be found during fieldwork along the river – on 05 Forest, Pará (L. Naka, in litt. 2006) and also at Trairão, October 2007 no fewer than five individuals were detected Pará (Pacheco and Olmos 2005); recent records from the along an 8 km stretch of river. In July 2008 three birds Roosevelt River in southern Amazonas state have further were detected at a single location on consecutive dates elucidated the species’ range (Whittaker 2009). along a narrow (40 m) section of the river, where attracted During fieldwork on the São Benedito II River (known with playback of the song of the Amazonian Pygmy- locally as “Rio Azul”), municipality of Novo Progresso, Pará Owl Glaucidium hardyi Vielliard, 1990. Subsequently, in (09°14’39” S, 55°59’16” W) we discovered two or three November 2008 while leading a commercial birdwatching individual males and a single female T. pella at the edge of tour along the Cristalino River in the municipality of Novo a narrow black- or clear-water river on 31 July 2007. All Mundo, Mato Grosso state (09°33’50” S, 55°54’28” W), individuals were observed hawking insects over the river, BJWD located a single female T. pella perched low (< 0.5 both at the edge and over open water some 10 m from m) on a dead branch overhanging the river’s edge. The the bank, at heights from 10 cm (close to the riverbank) presence of the species was suspected upon detection of its to 2.5 m (mid-river) above the river’s surface. A pair was harsh vocalizations, and once located was approachable to subsequently relocated near the same spot on 03 August a few meters where M. Reid obtained the first photographic 2007 where observed for 45 minutes at mid-day as they evidence for the species at this well-watched locality (A. fed on nectar and defended an unidentified tree laden Lees in litt. 2009). A further record from the Cristalino with flowering vines from several White-necked Jacobin River was obtained on 17 November 2009 when BJWD Florisuga mellivora (Linnaeus, 1758) and White-chinned briefly observed an adult male alternately bathing in and Sapphire Hylocharis cyanus (Vieillot, 1818). When not hovering about 1 m above a small lagoon inside igapó feeding or disputing territory, the birds perched in the forest 150 m from the river’s edge. open on exposed twigs in the upper levels of the tree at The majority of our records of T. pella were from the heights from 4-8 m. Our anecdotal feeding observations edges of the two narrow blackwater rivers we surveyed, Check List | Volume 6 | Issue 3 | 2010 397 N N G G D N Davis and Olmstead | Aves, Apodiformes, Trochilidae, Topaza pella (Linnaeus, 1758) the São Benedito II and the Cristalino. The species is cyanicterus (Vieillot, 1819) (Peres and Whittaker 1991), strongly associated with small watercourses; Nicholson Dotted Tanager Tangara varia (Statius Muller, 1776) (Lees (1931) recorded 44 nests in Guyana along a narrow et al. 2008; Whittaker 2009) and Red-and-black Grosbeak tributary of the Essequibo averaging 12 m in width. Both Periporphyrus erythromelas (Gmelin, 1789) (Fernandes Nicholson (1931) and Davis (1958) correlated the width 2007). of a watercourse with the presence/absence of Topaza. Forest streams too narrow to open a significant space in the canopy are mostly avoided by Topaza. During fieldwork from 2004 to 2009 along the Cristalino, we failed to detect the species at any of the five small streams we visited regularly within closed canopy terra firme forest. On the São Benedito II a pair was tape-recorded in taller forest (~ 20 m) canopy defending a flowering Inga sp. along a perennial forest stream (average width of 2-3 m) in May 2008 and a single male was seen at the edge of a large anthropogenic clearing bordering tall transitional forest in July 2008. The latter observation was our only encounter with the species away from water. Furthermore, the majority of our observations of the species at the two localities were in relatively stunted gallery forest on a sandy substrate (canopy heights from 10-20 m on the São Benedito II, greater than 20 m on the Cristalino). While canopy height appeared to make little difference in habitat selection – birds were variably observed from treetops down to the water’s surface – there may be other edaphic factors which dictate the presence or absence of the species in the region. Dedicated searching for the Figure 1. Localities for Topaza pella (Linnaeus, 1758) in Amazonian species in river-edge forests and in tall terra firme forest Brazil south of the Amazon River. 1 = Cachoeira Nazaré, Rondônia; 2 away from watercourses in the Alta Floresta/Cristalino = Tapajós National Forest, Pará; 3 = Trairão, Pará; 4 = Roosevelt River, area yielded just the two November records. In spite of its Amazonas; 5 = São Benedito II River, Pará; 6 = Cristalino River, Mato Grosso; 7 = Caxiuanã National Forest, Pará. presumed preference for forest canopies when away from watercourses, we consider T. pella a difficult species to overlook given its loud and distinctive vocalizations. Acknowledgments: We would like to thank Carlos and Ivaní Carvalho of These documented records represent the fourth and the Pousada Rio Azul for their invitation to undertake ornithological work fifth published localities for T. pella in the Tapajós-Xingu on the São Benedito II and for their endless hospitality during our visits. Thanks also go to Vitor de Q. Piacentini and Alexander C. Lees for their interfluvium (Figure 1), and extend its southeastern comments on the manuscript and to Travis Rosenberry of the Peregrine range limit by 550 km south from Trairão and 550 km Fund and Cameron Davis for their assistance in obtaining references. A east from the Roosevelt River. Our records bridge a special thanks to Andrew Davis for taking the time to produce the fine map which accompanies this paper. major gap in the published distribution of the species and suggest that the Rondônia population is not isolated but more likely lies near the distributional limit of an Literature Cited undersampled intervening range. Filling distribution Aleixo, A. and F. Poletto. 2007. Birds of an open vegetation enclave in gaps in the Amazon basin on a species by species basis southern Brazilian Amazonia. Wilson Journal of Ornithology 119(4): 610-630. is vital to the understanding of habitat preferences Alvarez, J. and B.M. Whitney. 2003. New distributional records of birds and the conservation needs of individual species. As from white-sand forests of the Northern Peruvian Amazon, with southern and eastern Amazonian Brazil receive greater implications for biogeography of Northern South America. Condor 105(3): 552-566. sampling effort, it is likely that the range of T. pella will Amaral, F.S.R., L.F. Silveira and B.M. Whitney. 2007. New localities for be further reinforced as field workers investigate areas the Black-faced Hawk (Leucopternis melanops) south of the Amazon with appropriate habitat meeting the species’ ecological River and description of the immature plumage of the White-browed Hawk (Leucopternis kuhli). Wilson Journal of Ornithology 119(3): requirements. Recent fieldwork in the southern Amazon 450-454. both west and east of the Tapajós River has revealed the Davis, T.A.W. 1958. The displays and nests of three forest hummingbirds presence of species with similar distributional patterns to of British Guiana. Ibis 100: 31-39. Fernandes, A.M. 2007. Southern range extension for the Red-and-black T. pella which had previously been considered restricted Grosbeak (Periporphyrus erythromelas, Cardinalidae), Amazonian to the Guianas and northeastern Amazonia such as Brazil. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia 15(3): 468-469. Black-faced Hawk Leucopternis melanops (Latham, 1790) Henriques, L.M.P., J.M. Wunderle, Jr. and M.R. Willig. 2003. Birds of the Tapajós National Forest, Brazilian Amazon: a preliminary assessment. (Amaral et al. 2007), Yellow-throated Flycatcher Conopias Ornitologia Neotropical 14: 307-338. parvus (Pelzeln, 1868) (Peres and Whittaker 1991; Alvarez Hu, D., L. Joseph and D. Agro. 2000. Distribution, variation, and taxonomy and Whitney 2003; Poletto and Aleixo 2005; Aleixo and of Topaza hummingbirds (Aves: Trochilidae). Ornitologia Neotropical 11(2): 123-142. Poletto 2007), Guianan Red-Cotinga Phoenicircus carnifex Lees, A.C., B.J.W. Davis, A.V.G. Oliveira and C.A. Peres. 2008. Avifauna of a (Linnaeus, 1758) (Pacheco et al. 2007), Crimson Fruitcrow structurally heteregeneous forest landscape in the Serra dos Caiabis, Haematoderus militaris (Shaw, 1792) (Stotz et al. 1997; Mato Grosso, Brazil: a preliminary assessment. Cotinga 29(1): 149- Whittaker 2009), Blue-backed Tanager Cyanicterus Check List | Volume 6 | Issue 3 | 2010 398 Davis and Olmstead | Aves, Apodiformes, Trochilidae, Topaza pella (Linnaeus, 1758) Nicholson, E.M. 1931. Field-notes on the Guiana King Humming-bird. Ibis Schuchmann, K.L. 1999. Family Trochilidae (hummingbirds); p. 468-680. 73(3): 534-553. In J. del Hoyo, A. Elliot and J. Sargatal (eds.) Handbook of the birds of Pacheco, J.F. and F. Olmos. 2005. Birds of a latitudinal transect in the the world. Volume 5: Barn-owls to hummingbirds. Barcelona: Lynx Tapajós-Xingu interfluvium, eastern Brazilian Amazonia. Ararajuba Edicions. 13(1): 29-46. Stotz, D.F., S.M. Lanyon, T.S. Schulenberg, D.E. Willard, A.T. Peterson and Pacheco, J.F., G.M. Kirwan, A. Aleixo, B.M. Whitney, A. Whittaker, J. Minns, J.W. Fitzpatrick. 1997. An avifaunal survey of two tropical forest K.J. Zimmer, P.S.M. Fonseca, M.F.C. Lima and D.C. Oren. 2007. An localities on the middle Rio Ji-Paraná, Rondônia, Brazil. Ornithological avifaunal inventory of the CVRD Serra dos Carajás project, Pará, Monographs 48(1): 763-781. Brazil. Cotinga 27(1): 15-30. Whittaker, A. 2009. Pousada Rio Roosevelt: a provisional avifaunal Peres, C.A. and A. Whittaker. 1991. Annotated checklist of the bird species inventory in south-western Amazonian Brazil, with information on of the upper Rio Urucu, Amazonas, Brazil. Bulletin of the British life history, new distributional data and comments on taxonomy. Ornithologist’s Club 111(3): 156-171. Cotinga 31(1): 20-43. Poletto, F. and A. Aleixo. 2005. Implicações biogeográficas de novos registros ornitológicos em um enclave de vegetação de campino Received: December 2009 no sudoeste da Amazônia brasileira. Revista Brasileira de Zoologia Revised: May 2010 22(4): 1196-1200. Accepted : May 2010 Ridgely, R.S., D. Agro and L. Joseph. 2005. Birds of Iwokrama Forest. Published online : August 2010 Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia Editorial responsibility : Leandro Bugoni 154(1): 109-121. Check List | Volume 6 | Issue 3 | 2010 399 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Check List Unpaywall

Aves, Apodiformes, Trochilidae, Topaza pella (Linnaeus, 1758): a range reinforcement in Amazonian Brazil

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ISSN 1809-127X (online edition) © 2010 Check List and Authors Chec List Open Access | Freely available at www.checklist.org.br Journal of species lists and distribution Aves, Apodiformes, Trochilidae, Topaza pella (Linnaeus, 1758): A range reinforcement in io ri Amazonian Brazil ap 1* 2 Bradley J.W. Davis and Scott T. Olmstead o 1 Rua São Cosme e Damião, 247, Caixa Postal 481. CEP 78580-000. Alta Floresta, MT, Brazil. 2 Tropical Birding, Felix Oralabal N45-55 y Joaquín Paredes, Edificio Espinosa piso 3. Quito, Ecuador. * Corresponding author e-mail: sclateria@yahoo.ca te Abstract: We present new distribution records for Topaza pella (Linnaeus, 1758) in the southern reaches of the Amazon Basin in Brazil. The two new localities presented for the species elucidate its range in southern Pará and northern Mato Grosso states, and in consideration of recent records elsewhere south of the Amazon River, suggest that the species is widely distributed across suitable habitat throughout the Brazilian Amazon. The Topaza hummingbirds are amongst the largest are consistent with other published observations of the members of the family, occupying lowland forests of genus from Brazil (e.g. Peres and Whittaker 1991; Stotz northern Amazonia and the Guianan Shield where they et al. 1997; Henriques et al. 2003). BJWD made field apparently prefer the canopy and edge of forests on sandy recordings of the species’ characteristic loud vocalizations soils, particularly along narrow blackwater streams and during both initial encounters with the species using a elsewhere near water (Schuchmann 1999; Ridgely et al. Sennheiser ME-67 shotgun microphone and a Marantz 2005). Hu et al. (2000) defined the known range limits for PMD-660 digital field recorder. These recordings will the Topaza hummingbirds and mapped the occurrence of be archived at the INPA Bird Collection in Manaus and Topaza pella (Linnaeus, 1758) across SE Venezuela and truncated cuts are also available at an online open-access the Guianas, as well as from the central Brazilian Amazon resource (www.xeno-canto.org). in the state of Amazonas east to northwestern Pará state In return visits to the São Benedito II River in October at the mouth of the Amazon River, in addition to a single 2007 and during week-long visits in each of the months of isolated locality in eastern Rondônia state. Subsequent May, June, July and November 2008, and also in February, fieldwork in the eastern Amazon basin has confirmed the May, September and October 2009, BJWD found T. pella to presence of T. pella in the Tapajós National Forest near be fairly common in the area. Multiple individuals could Santarém, Pará (Henriques et al. 2003), Caxiaunã National typically be found during fieldwork along the river – on 05 Forest, Pará (L. Naka, in litt. 2006) and also at Trairão, October 2007 no fewer than five individuals were detected Pará (Pacheco and Olmos 2005); recent records from the along an 8 km stretch of river. In July 2008 three birds Roosevelt River in southern Amazonas state have further were detected at a single location on consecutive dates elucidated the species’ range (Whittaker 2009). along a narrow (40 m) section of the river, where attracted During fieldwork on the São Benedito II River (known with playback of the song of the Amazonian Pygmy- locally as “Rio Azul”), municipality of Novo Progresso, Pará Owl Glaucidium hardyi Vielliard, 1990. Subsequently, in (09°14’39” S, 55°59’16” W) we discovered two or three November 2008 while leading a commercial birdwatching individual males and a single female T. pella at the edge of tour along the Cristalino River in the municipality of Novo a narrow black- or clear-water river on 31 July 2007. All Mundo, Mato Grosso state (09°33’50” S, 55°54’28” W), individuals were observed hawking insects over the river, BJWD located a single female T. pella perched low (< 0.5 both at the edge and over open water some 10 m from m) on a dead branch overhanging the river’s edge. The the bank, at heights from 10 cm (close to the riverbank) presence of the species was suspected upon detection of its to 2.5 m (mid-river) above the river’s surface. A pair was harsh vocalizations, and once located was approachable to subsequently relocated near the same spot on 03 August a few meters where M. Reid obtained the first photographic 2007 where observed for 45 minutes at mid-day as they evidence for the species at this well-watched locality (A. fed on nectar and defended an unidentified tree laden Lees in litt. 2009). A further record from the Cristalino with flowering vines from several White-necked Jacobin River was obtained on 17 November 2009 when BJWD Florisuga mellivora (Linnaeus, 1758) and White-chinned briefly observed an adult male alternately bathing in and Sapphire Hylocharis cyanus (Vieillot, 1818). When not hovering about 1 m above a small lagoon inside igapó feeding or disputing territory, the birds perched in the forest 150 m from the river’s edge. open on exposed twigs in the upper levels of the tree at The majority of our records of T. pella were from the heights from 4-8 m. Our anecdotal feeding observations edges of the two narrow blackwater rivers we surveyed, Check List | Volume 6 | Issue 3 | 2010 397 N N G G D N Davis and Olmstead | Aves, Apodiformes, Trochilidae, Topaza pella (Linnaeus, 1758) the São Benedito II and the Cristalino. The species is cyanicterus (Vieillot, 1819) (Peres and Whittaker 1991), strongly associated with small watercourses; Nicholson Dotted Tanager Tangara varia (Statius Muller, 1776) (Lees (1931) recorded 44 nests in Guyana along a narrow et al. 2008; Whittaker 2009) and Red-and-black Grosbeak tributary of the Essequibo averaging 12 m in width. Both Periporphyrus erythromelas (Gmelin, 1789) (Fernandes Nicholson (1931) and Davis (1958) correlated the width 2007). of a watercourse with the presence/absence of Topaza. Forest streams too narrow to open a significant space in the canopy are mostly avoided by Topaza. During fieldwork from 2004 to 2009 along the Cristalino, we failed to detect the species at any of the five small streams we visited regularly within closed canopy terra firme forest. On the São Benedito II a pair was tape-recorded in taller forest (~ 20 m) canopy defending a flowering Inga sp. along a perennial forest stream (average width of 2-3 m) in May 2008 and a single male was seen at the edge of a large anthropogenic clearing bordering tall transitional forest in July 2008. The latter observation was our only encounter with the species away from water. Furthermore, the majority of our observations of the species at the two localities were in relatively stunted gallery forest on a sandy substrate (canopy heights from 10-20 m on the São Benedito II, greater than 20 m on the Cristalino). While canopy height appeared to make little difference in habitat selection – birds were variably observed from treetops down to the water’s surface – there may be other edaphic factors which dictate the presence or absence of the species in the region. Dedicated searching for the Figure 1. Localities for Topaza pella (Linnaeus, 1758) in Amazonian species in river-edge forests and in tall terra firme forest Brazil south of the Amazon River. 1 = Cachoeira Nazaré, Rondônia; 2 away from watercourses in the Alta Floresta/Cristalino = Tapajós National Forest, Pará; 3 = Trairão, Pará; 4 = Roosevelt River, area yielded just the two November records. In spite of its Amazonas; 5 = São Benedito II River, Pará; 6 = Cristalino River, Mato Grosso; 7 = Caxiuanã National Forest, Pará. presumed preference for forest canopies when away from watercourses, we consider T. pella a difficult species to overlook given its loud and distinctive vocalizations. Acknowledgments: We would like to thank Carlos and Ivaní Carvalho of These documented records represent the fourth and the Pousada Rio Azul for their invitation to undertake ornithological work fifth published localities for T. pella in the Tapajós-Xingu on the São Benedito II and for their endless hospitality during our visits. Thanks also go to Vitor de Q. Piacentini and Alexander C. Lees for their interfluvium (Figure 1), and extend its southeastern comments on the manuscript and to Travis Rosenberry of the Peregrine range limit by 550 km south from Trairão and 550 km Fund and Cameron Davis for their assistance in obtaining references. A east from the Roosevelt River. Our records bridge a special thanks to Andrew Davis for taking the time to produce the fine map which accompanies this paper. major gap in the published distribution of the species and suggest that the Rondônia population is not isolated but more likely lies near the distributional limit of an Literature Cited undersampled intervening range. Filling distribution Aleixo, A. and F. Poletto. 2007. Birds of an open vegetation enclave in gaps in the Amazon basin on a species by species basis southern Brazilian Amazonia. Wilson Journal of Ornithology 119(4): 610-630. is vital to the understanding of habitat preferences Alvarez, J. and B.M. Whitney. 2003. New distributional records of birds and the conservation needs of individual species. As from white-sand forests of the Northern Peruvian Amazon, with southern and eastern Amazonian Brazil receive greater implications for biogeography of Northern South America. Condor 105(3): 552-566. sampling effort, it is likely that the range of T. pella will Amaral, F.S.R., L.F. Silveira and B.M. Whitney. 2007. New localities for be further reinforced as field workers investigate areas the Black-faced Hawk (Leucopternis melanops) south of the Amazon with appropriate habitat meeting the species’ ecological River and description of the immature plumage of the White-browed Hawk (Leucopternis kuhli). Wilson Journal of Ornithology 119(3): requirements. Recent fieldwork in the southern Amazon 450-454. both west and east of the Tapajós River has revealed the Davis, T.A.W. 1958. The displays and nests of three forest hummingbirds presence of species with similar distributional patterns to of British Guiana. Ibis 100: 31-39. Fernandes, A.M. 2007. Southern range extension for the Red-and-black T. pella which had previously been considered restricted Grosbeak (Periporphyrus erythromelas, Cardinalidae), Amazonian to the Guianas and northeastern Amazonia such as Brazil. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia 15(3): 468-469. Black-faced Hawk Leucopternis melanops (Latham, 1790) Henriques, L.M.P., J.M. Wunderle, Jr. and M.R. Willig. 2003. Birds of the Tapajós National Forest, Brazilian Amazon: a preliminary assessment. (Amaral et al. 2007), Yellow-throated Flycatcher Conopias Ornitologia Neotropical 14: 307-338. parvus (Pelzeln, 1868) (Peres and Whittaker 1991; Alvarez Hu, D., L. Joseph and D. Agro. 2000. Distribution, variation, and taxonomy and Whitney 2003; Poletto and Aleixo 2005; Aleixo and of Topaza hummingbirds (Aves: Trochilidae). Ornitologia Neotropical 11(2): 123-142. Poletto 2007), Guianan Red-Cotinga Phoenicircus carnifex Lees, A.C., B.J.W. Davis, A.V.G. Oliveira and C.A. Peres. 2008. Avifauna of a (Linnaeus, 1758) (Pacheco et al. 2007), Crimson Fruitcrow structurally heteregeneous forest landscape in the Serra dos Caiabis, Haematoderus militaris (Shaw, 1792) (Stotz et al. 1997; Mato Grosso, Brazil: a preliminary assessment. Cotinga 29(1): 149- Whittaker 2009), Blue-backed Tanager Cyanicterus Check List | Volume 6 | Issue 3 | 2010 398 Davis and Olmstead | Aves, Apodiformes, Trochilidae, Topaza pella (Linnaeus, 1758) Nicholson, E.M. 1931. Field-notes on the Guiana King Humming-bird. Ibis Schuchmann, K.L. 1999. Family Trochilidae (hummingbirds); p. 468-680. 73(3): 534-553. In J. del Hoyo, A. Elliot and J. Sargatal (eds.) Handbook of the birds of Pacheco, J.F. and F. Olmos. 2005. Birds of a latitudinal transect in the the world. Volume 5: Barn-owls to hummingbirds. Barcelona: Lynx Tapajós-Xingu interfluvium, eastern Brazilian Amazonia. Ararajuba Edicions. 13(1): 29-46. Stotz, D.F., S.M. Lanyon, T.S. Schulenberg, D.E. Willard, A.T. Peterson and Pacheco, J.F., G.M. Kirwan, A. Aleixo, B.M. Whitney, A. Whittaker, J. Minns, J.W. Fitzpatrick. 1997. An avifaunal survey of two tropical forest K.J. Zimmer, P.S.M. Fonseca, M.F.C. Lima and D.C. Oren. 2007. An localities on the middle Rio Ji-Paraná, Rondônia, Brazil. Ornithological avifaunal inventory of the CVRD Serra dos Carajás project, Pará, Monographs 48(1): 763-781. Brazil. Cotinga 27(1): 15-30. Whittaker, A. 2009. Pousada Rio Roosevelt: a provisional avifaunal Peres, C.A. and A. Whittaker. 1991. Annotated checklist of the bird species inventory in south-western Amazonian Brazil, with information on of the upper Rio Urucu, Amazonas, Brazil. Bulletin of the British life history, new distributional data and comments on taxonomy. Ornithologist’s Club 111(3): 156-171. Cotinga 31(1): 20-43. Poletto, F. and A. Aleixo. 2005. Implicações biogeográficas de novos registros ornitológicos em um enclave de vegetação de campino Received: December 2009 no sudoeste da Amazônia brasileira. Revista Brasileira de Zoologia Revised: May 2010 22(4): 1196-1200. Accepted : May 2010 Ridgely, R.S., D. Agro and L. Joseph. 2005. Birds of Iwokrama Forest. Published online : August 2010 Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia Editorial responsibility : Leandro Bugoni 154(1): 109-121. Check List | Volume 6 | Issue 3 | 2010 399

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