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The Role of Conferences on the Pathway to Academic Impact: Evidence from a Natural Experiment

The Role of Conferences on the Pathway to Academic Impact: Evidence from a Natural Experiment <p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>We provide evidence for the effectiveness of conferences in promoting academic impact by exploiting the cancellation—due to Hurricane Isaac—of the 2012 American Political Science Association Annual Meeting. We assembled a data set of 29,142 papers and quantified conference effects, using difference-in-differences regressions. Within four years of being presented at the conference, a paper’s likelihood of becoming cited increases by five percentage points. We decompose the effects by authorship and provide an account of the underlying mechanisms. Overall, our findings point to the role of short-term face-to-face interactions in the formation and dissemination of scientific knowledge.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

The Role of Conferences on the Pathway to Academic Impact: Evidence from a Natural Experiment

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
© Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1548-8004

Abstract

<p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>We provide evidence for the effectiveness of conferences in promoting academic impact by exploiting the cancellation—due to Hurricane Isaac—of the 2012 American Political Science Association Annual Meeting. We assembled a data set of 29,142 papers and quantified conference effects, using difference-in-differences regressions. Within four years of being presented at the conference, a paper’s likelihood of becoming cited increases by five percentage points. We decompose the effects by authorship and provide an account of the underlying mechanisms. Overall, our findings point to the role of short-term face-to-face interactions in the formation and dissemination of scientific knowledge.</p>

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Feb 8, 2020

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