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The Persistent Effects of Early-Life Exposure to Air Pollution: Evidence from the Indonesian Forest Fires

The Persistent Effects of Early-Life Exposure to Air Pollution: Evidence from the Indonesian... <p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>We analyze the effects of early-life exposure to air pollution in a developing country on children&apos;s long-term human capital outcomes. We exploit the geographical variation of the 1997 Indonesian forest fires and cohort variation in exposure as a natural experiment. Children exposed to the fires are shorter on average three years post-exposure and have lower lung capacity 10 years post-exposure, but only children who were exposed in utero continue to exhibit shorter stature at 10 and 17 years post-exposure. We find suggestive evidence that these persistent effects may be due to expectant mothers experiencing poorer respiratory health during the fires.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

The Persistent Effects of Early-Life Exposure to Air Pollution: Evidence from the Indonesian Forest Fires

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
© Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1548-8004

Abstract

<p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>We analyze the effects of early-life exposure to air pollution in a developing country on children&apos;s long-term human capital outcomes. We exploit the geographical variation of the 1997 Indonesian forest fires and cohort variation in exposure as a natural experiment. Children exposed to the fires are shorter on average three years post-exposure and have lower lung capacity 10 years post-exposure, but only children who were exposed in utero continue to exhibit shorter stature at 10 and 17 years post-exposure. We find suggestive evidence that these persistent effects may be due to expectant mothers experiencing poorer respiratory health during the fires.</p>

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 7, 2019

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