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The Needs of the Army: Using Compulsory Relocation in the Military to Estimate the Effect of Air Pollutants on Children's Health

The Needs of the Army: Using Compulsory Relocation in the Military to Estimate the Effect of Air... Abstract: Recent research suggests that pollution has a large impact on asthma and other respiratory and cardiovascular conditions. But this relationship and its implications are not well understood. I use changes in location due to military transfers, which occur entirely to satisfy the needs of the army, to identify the causal impact of pollution on children's respiratory hospitalizations. I use individual-level data of military families and their dependents, matched at the zip code level with pollution data, for the period 1989-95. I find that for military children only ozone appears to have an adverse effect on health, although not for infants. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

The Needs of the Army: Using Compulsory Relocation in the Military to Estimate the Effect of Air Pollutants on Children's Health

Journal of Human Resources , Volume 45 (3) – Apr 4, 2010

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1548-8004
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Abstract

Abstract: Recent research suggests that pollution has a large impact on asthma and other respiratory and cardiovascular conditions. But this relationship and its implications are not well understood. I use changes in location due to military transfers, which occur entirely to satisfy the needs of the army, to identify the causal impact of pollution on children's respiratory hospitalizations. I use individual-level data of military families and their dependents, matched at the zip code level with pollution data, for the period 1989-95. I find that for military children only ozone appears to have an adverse effect on health, although not for infants.

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Apr 4, 2010

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