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The Intergenerational Transmission of Cognitive and Noncognitive Abilities

The Intergenerational Transmission of Cognitive and Noncognitive Abilities <p>We study the intergenerational transmission of cognitive and noncognitive abilities using population data and correct for measurement error in abilities using two sets of instruments. The results show that previous estimates are biased downward and that once measurement error is corrected for, the correlation in noncognitive ability is close to that of cognitive ability. By considering both parents, intergenerational ability correlations account for a substantial portion of the sibling correlation. Using adoptees, we find that the social impact of maternal abilities is more important than paternal abilities. Children&apos;s educational attainment and labor market outcomes are strongly related to parents&apos; cognitive and noncognitive abilities.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

The Intergenerational Transmission of Cognitive and Noncognitive Abilities

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
©by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1548-8004

Abstract

<p>We study the intergenerational transmission of cognitive and noncognitive abilities using population data and correct for measurement error in abilities using two sets of instruments. The results show that previous estimates are biased downward and that once measurement error is corrected for, the correlation in noncognitive ability is close to that of cognitive ability. By considering both parents, intergenerational ability correlations account for a substantial portion of the sibling correlation. Using adoptees, we find that the social impact of maternal abilities is more important than paternal abilities. Children&apos;s educational attainment and labor market outcomes are strongly related to parents&apos; cognitive and noncognitive abilities.</p>

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Oct 27, 2017

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