Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Impact of Low-Ability Peers on Cognitive and Noncognitive Outcomes: Random Assignment Evidence on the Effects and Operating Channels

The Impact of Low-Ability Peers on Cognitive and Noncognitive Outcomes: Random Assignment... <p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>This article presents new experimental estimates of the impact of low-ability peers on own outcomes using nationally representative data from China. We exploit the random assignment of students to junior high school classrooms and find that the proportion of low-ability peers, defined as having been retained during primary school ("repeaters"), has negative effects on nonrepeaters&apos; cognitive and noncognitive outcomes. An exploration of the mechanisms shows that a larger proportion of repeater peers is associated with reduced after-school study time. The negative effects are driven by male repeaters and are more pronounced among students with less strict parental monitoring at home.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

The Impact of Low-Ability Peers on Cognitive and Noncognitive Outcomes: Random Assignment Evidence on the Effects and Operating Channels

Journal of Human Resources , Volume 57 (2) – Mar 3, 2022

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-wisconsin-press/the-impact-of-low-ability-peers-on-cognitive-and-noncognitive-outcomes-iZjEQqgZzG
Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1548-8004

Abstract

<p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>This article presents new experimental estimates of the impact of low-ability peers on own outcomes using nationally representative data from China. We exploit the random assignment of students to junior high school classrooms and find that the proportion of low-ability peers, defined as having been retained during primary school ("repeaters"), has negative effects on nonrepeaters&apos; cognitive and noncognitive outcomes. An exploration of the mechanisms shows that a larger proportion of repeater peers is associated with reduced after-school study time. The negative effects are driven by male repeaters and are more pronounced among students with less strict parental monitoring at home.</p>

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Mar 3, 2022

There are no references for this article.