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The Gendered Labor Market Impacts of Trade Liberalization: Evidence from Brazil

The Gendered Labor Market Impacts of Trade Liberalization: Evidence from Brazil <p>This paper investigates the impact of Brazil&apos;s trade liberalization on gender differences in labor market outcomes, using difference-in-difference estimation that exploits variation in preliberalization industry composition across microregions. We find that trade liberalization reduced male and female labor force participation rates and tradable sector employment rates, particularly among the low-skilled population. As aggregate effects on men are significantly larger, liberalization reduced the percentage point gender gap in employment and participation rates. However, in proportionate terms, we find no evidence that women&apos;s employment and participation increased relative to men&apos;s, or that women benefitted from the procompetitive effects of free trade.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

The Gendered Labor Market Impacts of Trade Liberalization: Evidence from Brazil

Journal of Human Resources , Volume 52 (2) – May 10, 2017

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
©by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1548-8004

Abstract

<p>This paper investigates the impact of Brazil&apos;s trade liberalization on gender differences in labor market outcomes, using difference-in-difference estimation that exploits variation in preliberalization industry composition across microregions. We find that trade liberalization reduced male and female labor force participation rates and tradable sector employment rates, particularly among the low-skilled population. As aggregate effects on men are significantly larger, liberalization reduced the percentage point gender gap in employment and participation rates. However, in proportionate terms, we find no evidence that women&apos;s employment and participation increased relative to men&apos;s, or that women benefitted from the procompetitive effects of free trade.</p>

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: May 10, 2017

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