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The Effect of Food Stamps on Children's Health: Evidence from Immigrants' Changing Eligibility

The Effect of Food Stamps on Children's Health: Evidence from Immigrants' Changing... <p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>The Food Stamp program is currently one of the largest safety net programs in the United States and is especially important for families with children. The existing evidence on the effects of Food Stamps on children&apos;s and families&apos; outcomes is limited. I utilize a large, recent source of quasi-experimental variation—changes in documented immigrants&apos; eligibility across states and over time from 1996–2003—to estimate the effect of Food Stamps on children&apos;s health. I find loss of parental eligibility has large effects on program receipt, and an additional year of parental eligibility before age five improves health outcomes at ages 6–16.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

The Effect of Food Stamps on Children&apos;s Health: Evidence from Immigrants&apos; Changing Eligibility

Journal of Human Resources , Volume 55 (2) – Apr 17, 2020

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1548-8004

Abstract

<p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>The Food Stamp program is currently one of the largest safety net programs in the United States and is especially important for families with children. The existing evidence on the effects of Food Stamps on children&apos;s and families&apos; outcomes is limited. I utilize a large, recent source of quasi-experimental variation—changes in documented immigrants&apos; eligibility across states and over time from 1996–2003—to estimate the effect of Food Stamps on children&apos;s health. I find loss of parental eligibility has large effects on program receipt, and an additional year of parental eligibility before age five improves health outcomes at ages 6–16.</p>

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Apr 17, 2020

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