Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Decision to Carry: The Effect of Crime on Concealed-Carry Applications

The Decision to Carry: The Effect of Crime on Concealed-Carry Applications <p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>Despite persistent debate on the role of concealed-carry legislation, decisions to legally carry concealed handguns are not well understood. Using/detailed data on concealed-carry permit applications, we explore whether individuals apply for concealed-carry permits in response to crime. We find that recent homicides increase applications in areas relatively near to the incident. The effects are driven by gun-related homicides and are more pronounced for white, male, and Republican applicants. We also find suggestive evidence that applicants are more responsive when they share a demographic characteristic with the homicide victim. The results further indicate that applications after recent homicides are more likely to be renewed, consistent with persistent precautionary behaviors. Our findings provide causal evidence that crime risk influences individual decisions regarding legal gun use.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

The Decision to Carry: The Effect of Crime on Concealed-Carry Applications

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-wisconsin-press/the-decision-to-carry-the-effect-of-crime-on-concealed-carry-UYaF7ZV01n
Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
© Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1548-8004

Abstract

<p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>Despite persistent debate on the role of concealed-carry legislation, decisions to legally carry concealed handguns are not well understood. Using/detailed data on concealed-carry permit applications, we explore whether individuals apply for concealed-carry permits in response to crime. We find that recent homicides increase applications in areas relatively near to the incident. The effects are driven by gun-related homicides and are more pronounced for white, male, and Republican applicants. We also find suggestive evidence that applicants are more responsive when they share a demographic characteristic with the homicide victim. The results further indicate that applications after recent homicides are more likely to be renewed, consistent with persistent precautionary behaviors. Our findings provide causal evidence that crime risk influences individual decisions regarding legal gun use.</p>

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 7, 2019

There are no references for this article.