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Teacher Credentials and Student Achievement in High School: A Cross-Subject Analysis with Student Fixed Effects

Teacher Credentials and Student Achievement in High School: A Cross-Subject Analysis with Student... Abstract: We use data on statewide end-of-course tests in North Carolina to examine the relationship between teacher credentials and student achievement at the high school level. We find compelling evidence that teacher credentials, particularly licensure and certification, affects student achievement in systematic ways and that the magnitudes are large enough to be policy relevant. Our findings imply that the uneven distribution of teacher credentials by race and socioeconomic status of high school students—a pattern we also document—contributes to achievement gaps in high school. In addition, some troubling findings emerge related to the gender and race of the teachers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

Teacher Credentials and Student Achievement in High School: A Cross-Subject Analysis with Student Fixed Effects

Journal of Human Resources , Volume 45 (3) – Apr 4, 2010

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1548-8004
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Abstract

Abstract: We use data on statewide end-of-course tests in North Carolina to examine the relationship between teacher credentials and student achievement at the high school level. We find compelling evidence that teacher credentials, particularly licensure and certification, affects student achievement in systematic ways and that the magnitudes are large enough to be policy relevant. Our findings imply that the uneven distribution of teacher credentials by race and socioeconomic status of high school students—a pattern we also document—contributes to achievement gaps in high school. In addition, some troubling findings emerge related to the gender and race of the teachers.

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Apr 4, 2010

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