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Staying for Benefits: The Effect of a Health and Family Planning Program on Out-Migration Patterns in Bangladesh

Staying for Benefits: The Effect of a Health and Family Planning Program on Out-Migration... <p>There is concern that benefit programs may alter out-migration patterns. We exploit the quasi-random placement of a health and family planning program in Bangladesh to examine changes in out-migration patterns. Using individual-level migration data from 1979–91, we find that the flow of out-migration was approximately 15 percent lower for women and men in the treatment versus comparison area. We find comparable changes in out-migrant stock, showing that effects persisted even after allowing for return migration. Our findings suggest that benefit programs can lead to longer run changes in population, with consequences for program evaluation design and economic development.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

Staying for Benefits: The Effect of a Health and Family Planning Program on Out-Migration Patterns in Bangladesh

Journal of Human Resources , Volume 49 (4) – Nov 5, 2014

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
©by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1548-8004

Abstract

<p>There is concern that benefit programs may alter out-migration patterns. We exploit the quasi-random placement of a health and family planning program in Bangladesh to examine changes in out-migration patterns. Using individual-level migration data from 1979–91, we find that the flow of out-migration was approximately 15 percent lower for women and men in the treatment versus comparison area. We find comparable changes in out-migrant stock, showing that effects persisted even after allowing for return migration. Our findings suggest that benefit programs can lead to longer run changes in population, with consequences for program evaluation design and economic development.</p>

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 5, 2014

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