Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Shackled to the Soil? Inherited Land, Birth Order, and Labor Mobility

Shackled to the Soil? Inherited Land, Birth Order, and Labor Mobility <p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>The inheritance of wealth promotes occupational choice, but may restrict it where its use is constrained by limited markets and cultural norms. This work investigates the effects of inheriting agricultural land in rural India and finds that while larger inheritances, on average, increase future household consumption, firstborn sons do not experience these gains. For firstborns, inheriting land reduces migration and entry into nonagricultural work. In contrast, inheriting land does not influence occupational choice or migration for latter-born sons. I attribute these differences, in part, to a cultural norm of parental support incumbent on firstborns and its interaction with inherited land.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

Shackled to the Soil? Inherited Land, Birth Order, and Labor Mobility

Journal of Human Resources , Volume 57 (2) – Mar 3, 2022

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-wisconsin-press/shackled-to-the-soil-inherited-land-birth-order-and-labor-mobility-2CFp0QzeII
Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1548-8004

Abstract

<p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>The inheritance of wealth promotes occupational choice, but may restrict it where its use is constrained by limited markets and cultural norms. This work investigates the effects of inheriting agricultural land in rural India and finds that while larger inheritances, on average, increase future household consumption, firstborn sons do not experience these gains. For firstborns, inheriting land reduces migration and entry into nonagricultural work. In contrast, inheriting land does not influence occupational choice or migration for latter-born sons. I attribute these differences, in part, to a cultural norm of parental support incumbent on firstborns and its interaction with inherited land.</p>

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Mar 3, 2022

There are no references for this article.