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Settling for Academia? H-1B Visas and the Career Choices of International Students in the United States

Settling for Academia? H-1B Visas and the Career Choices of International Students in the United... <p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>The yearly cap on H-1B visas became binding for the first time in 2004, making it harder for college-educated foreigners to work in the United States. However, academic institutions are exempt from the cap, and citizens of five countries (Canada, Mexico, Chile, Singapore, and Australia) have access to alternative work visas. We exploit these exemptions to gauge how immigrant career choices have been affected by the binding visa cap. Among other impacts, the binding cap raises international students&apos; likelihood of employment in academia, even outside of their field of study, a result consistent with the notion of "settling" for academia.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

Settling for Academia? H-1B Visas and the Career Choices of International Students in the United States

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
©by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1548-8004

Abstract

<p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>The yearly cap on H-1B visas became binding for the first time in 2004, making it harder for college-educated foreigners to work in the United States. However, academic institutions are exempt from the cap, and citizens of five countries (Canada, Mexico, Chile, Singapore, and Australia) have access to alternative work visas. We exploit these exemptions to gauge how immigrant career choices have been affected by the binding visa cap. Among other impacts, the binding cap raises international students&apos; likelihood of employment in academia, even outside of their field of study, a result consistent with the notion of "settling" for academia.</p>

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: May 22, 2019

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