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Intergenerational Occupational Mobility in Rural Economy: Evidence from Nepal and Vietnam

Intergenerational Occupational Mobility in Rural Economy: Evidence from Nepal and Vietnam Abstract: This paper presents evidence on intergenerational occupational mobility from agriculture to the nonfarm sector using survey data from Nepal and Vietnam. In the absence of credible instruments, the degree of selection on observables is used as a guide to the degree of selection on unobservables, à la Altonji et al. (2005) to address the unobserved genetic correlations. The results show that intergenerational occupational mobility is lower among women in both countries, and is lower in Nepal compared with Vietnam. In the case of Nepal, strong evidence favors a causal role played by the mother's nonfarm participation in the daughter's occupation choice, possibly because of cultural inheritance in a traditional society. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

Intergenerational Occupational Mobility in Rural Economy: Evidence from Nepal and Vietnam

Journal of Human Resources , Volume 46 (2) – Apr 4, 2011

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
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Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1548-8004
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Abstract

Abstract: This paper presents evidence on intergenerational occupational mobility from agriculture to the nonfarm sector using survey data from Nepal and Vietnam. In the absence of credible instruments, the degree of selection on observables is used as a guide to the degree of selection on unobservables, à la Altonji et al. (2005) to address the unobserved genetic correlations. The results show that intergenerational occupational mobility is lower among women in both countries, and is lower in Nepal compared with Vietnam. In the case of Nepal, strong evidence favors a causal role played by the mother's nonfarm participation in the daughter's occupation choice, possibly because of cultural inheritance in a traditional society.

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Apr 4, 2011

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