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Infant Health and Later-Life Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from the Introduction of Sulfa Antibiotics in Sweden

Infant Health and Later-Life Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from the Introduction of Sulfa... <p>ABSTRACT:</p><p><i>This study examines the effects of improvements in infant health produced by the introduction in the late 1930s of sulfapyridine as treatment against pneumonia on outcomes in adulthood. On the basis of longitudinal individual data for the whole population of Sweden 1968–2012 and archival data on the availability of sulfapyridine, I apply a difference-indifferences approach and find that mitigation of pneumonia infection in infancy increased labor income in late adulthood by 2.8–5.1 percent. The beneficial effects are strong for health, measured by length of stay in hospital, but weaker for years of schooling. These effects are similar for men and women</i>.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

Infant Health and Later-Life Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from the Introduction of Sulfa Antibiotics in Sweden

Journal of Human Resources , Volume 55 (2) – Apr 17, 2020

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1548-8004

Abstract

<p>ABSTRACT:</p><p><i>This study examines the effects of improvements in infant health produced by the introduction in the late 1930s of sulfapyridine as treatment against pneumonia on outcomes in adulthood. On the basis of longitudinal individual data for the whole population of Sweden 1968–2012 and archival data on the availability of sulfapyridine, I apply a difference-indifferences approach and find that mitigation of pneumonia infection in infancy increased labor income in late adulthood by 2.8–5.1 percent. The beneficial effects are strong for health, measured by length of stay in hospital, but weaker for years of schooling. These effects are similar for men and women</i>.</p>

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Apr 17, 2020

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