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Generosity and Prosocial Behavior in Healthcare Provision: Evidence from the Laboratory and Field

Generosity and Prosocial Behavior in Healthcare Provision: Evidence from the Laboratory and Field <p>Do health workers sometimes have intrinsic motivation to help their patients? We examine the correlation between the generosity of clinicians—as measured in a laboratory experiment—and the quality of care they provide (1) in their normal work environment, (2) when a peer observes them, and (3) six weeks after an encouragement visit from a peer. We find that clinicians defined as generous in the laboratory provide 8 percent better care in their normal work environment. On average, all clinicians provide 3 percent and 8 percent better care when observed by a peer and after encouragement, respectively. Importantly, generous clinicians react to peer scrutiny and encouragement in the same way as ungenerous clinicians.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

Generosity and Prosocial Behavior in Healthcare Provision: Evidence from the Laboratory and Field

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
©by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1548-8004

Abstract

<p>Do health workers sometimes have intrinsic motivation to help their patients? We examine the correlation between the generosity of clinicians—as measured in a laboratory experiment—and the quality of care they provide (1) in their normal work environment, (2) when a peer observes them, and (3) six weeks after an encouragement visit from a peer. We find that clinicians defined as generous in the laboratory provide 8 percent better care in their normal work environment. On average, all clinicians provide 3 percent and 8 percent better care when observed by a peer and after encouragement, respectively. Importantly, generous clinicians react to peer scrutiny and encouragement in the same way as ungenerous clinicians.</p>

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Feb 9, 2016

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