Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Father Presence and the Intergenerational Transmission of Educational Attainment

Father Presence and the Intergenerational Transmission of Educational Attainment ABSTRACT: We use administrative data from Norway to analyze how fathers’ presence affects the intergenerational transmission of educational attainment. Our empirical strategy exploits within family variation in father exposure that occurs across siblings in the event of father death. We find that longer paternal exposure amplifies the father-child association in education and attenuates the mother-child association. These changes in the intergenerational transmission process are economically significant, and stronger for boys than for girls. We find no evidence these effects operate through changes in family economic resources or maternal labor supply. This lends support for parental socialization as the likely mechanism. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

Father Presence and the Intergenerational Transmission of Educational Attainment

Journal of Human Resources , Volume 51 (4) – Nov 22, 2016

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-wisconsin-press/father-presence-and-the-intergenerational-transmission-of-educational-ZIQwOWHZf6
Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
©by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1548-8004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT: We use administrative data from Norway to analyze how fathers’ presence affects the intergenerational transmission of educational attainment. Our empirical strategy exploits within family variation in father exposure that occurs across siblings in the event of father death. We find that longer paternal exposure amplifies the father-child association in education and attenuates the mother-child association. These changes in the intergenerational transmission process are economically significant, and stronger for boys than for girls. We find no evidence these effects operate through changes in family economic resources or maternal labor supply. This lends support for parental socialization as the likely mechanism.

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 22, 2016

There are no references for this article.