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Estimation of an Occupational Choice Model when Occupations are Misclassified

Estimation of an Occupational Choice Model when Occupations are Misclassified Abstract: This paper develops an empirical occupational choice model that corrects for misclassification in occupational choices and measurement error in occupation-specific work experience. The model is used to estimate the extent of measurement error in occupation data and quantify the bias that results from ignoring measurement error in occupation codes when studying the determinants of occupational choices and estimating the effects of occupation-specific human capital on wages. The parameter estimates reveal that 9 percent of occupational choices in the 1979 cohort of the NLSY are misclassified. Ignoring misclassification leads to biases that affect the conclusions drawn from empirical occupational choice models. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

Estimation of an Occupational Choice Model when Occupations are Misclassified

Journal of Human Resources , Volume 44 (2) – Apr 4, 2009

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1548-8004
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: This paper develops an empirical occupational choice model that corrects for misclassification in occupational choices and measurement error in occupation-specific work experience. The model is used to estimate the extent of measurement error in occupation data and quantify the bias that results from ignoring measurement error in occupation codes when studying the determinants of occupational choices and estimating the effects of occupation-specific human capital on wages. The parameter estimates reveal that 9 percent of occupational choices in the 1979 cohort of the NLSY are misclassified. Ignoring misclassification leads to biases that affect the conclusions drawn from empirical occupational choice models.

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Apr 4, 2009

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