Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Education and Incarceration in the Jim Crow South: Evidence from Rosenwald Schools

Education and Incarceration in the Jim Crow South: Evidence from Rosenwald Schools <p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>This paper examines the effect of childhood access to primary schooling on adult black incarceration in the early 20th century. I construct a linked census data set of incarcerated and nonincarcerated men to observe access to schooling in childhood. I find that full exposure to one of the new primary schools built as part of the Rosenwald program reduces the probability of incarceration by 1.9 percentage points. I argue that the reduction in incarceration comes from increased opportunity costs of crime through higher educational attainment. These results contribute to a broader literature on racial gaps in social outcomes in the United States.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

Education and Incarceration in the Jim Crow South: Evidence from Rosenwald Schools

Journal of Human Resources , Volume 55 (1) – Feb 8, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-wisconsin-press/education-and-incarceration-in-the-jim-crow-south-evidence-from-MsUQ06PF9i
Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
© Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1548-8004

Abstract

<p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>This paper examines the effect of childhood access to primary schooling on adult black incarceration in the early 20th century. I construct a linked census data set of incarcerated and nonincarcerated men to observe access to schooling in childhood. I find that full exposure to one of the new primary schools built as part of the Rosenwald program reduces the probability of incarceration by 1.9 percentage points. I argue that the reduction in incarceration comes from increased opportunity costs of crime through higher educational attainment. These results contribute to a broader literature on racial gaps in social outcomes in the United States.</p>

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Feb 8, 2020

There are no references for this article.