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Childcare, Eldercare, and Labor Force Participation of Married Women in Urban China, 1982-2000

Childcare, Eldercare, and Labor Force Participation of Married Women in Urban China, 1982-2000 Abstract: We employ Chinese population census data to consider married, urban women's labor force participation decisions in the context of their families. We find that the presence in the household of a parent, parent-in-law, or person aged 75 or older increases prime-age women's likelihood of participating in market work. The presence of preschool-aged children decreases it. The negative effect on women's labor force participation of having young children in the household is substantially larger for married, rural-to-urban migrants than for their nonmigrant counterparts. Similarly, the positive effect of coresidence with elders is larger for rural-to-urban migrant women than for nonmigrants. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

Childcare, Eldercare, and Labor Force Participation of Married Women in Urban China, 1982-2000

Journal of Human Resources , Volume 46 (2) – Apr 4, 2011

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University of Wisconsin Press
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Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
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1548-8004
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Abstract

Abstract: We employ Chinese population census data to consider married, urban women's labor force participation decisions in the context of their families. We find that the presence in the household of a parent, parent-in-law, or person aged 75 or older increases prime-age women's likelihood of participating in market work. The presence of preschool-aged children decreases it. The negative effect on women's labor force participation of having young children in the household is substantially larger for married, rural-to-urban migrants than for their nonmigrant counterparts. Similarly, the positive effect of coresidence with elders is larger for rural-to-urban migrant women than for nonmigrants.

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Apr 4, 2011

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