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Charitable Giving by Married Couples Revisited

Charitable Giving by Married Couples Revisited Abstract: This paper investigates the effect of gender differences and household bargaining on charitable giving. I replicate the study of Andreoni, Brown, and Rischall (2003) using a different data set—the recently available Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) supplement on charitable giving—and test the sensitivity of their results to inclusion of additional control variables and the endogeneity of the tax price of giving. First, focusing on singles, I find that males and females have significantly different tendencies toward giving to different areas of charitable activity. Next, comparing households in which husband and wife make a joint decision on donations with those in which couples separately decide or assign a sole decisionmaker, I show that bargaining over giving increases the amount of charitable contributions by almost 7 percent. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

Charitable Giving by Married Couples Revisited

Journal of Human Resources , Volume 45 (2) – Apr 4, 2010

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1548-8004
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Abstract

Abstract: This paper investigates the effect of gender differences and household bargaining on charitable giving. I replicate the study of Andreoni, Brown, and Rischall (2003) using a different data set—the recently available Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) supplement on charitable giving—and test the sensitivity of their results to inclusion of additional control variables and the endogeneity of the tax price of giving. First, focusing on singles, I find that males and females have significantly different tendencies toward giving to different areas of charitable activity. Next, comparing households in which husband and wife make a joint decision on donations with those in which couples separately decide or assign a sole decisionmaker, I show that bargaining over giving increases the amount of charitable contributions by almost 7 percent.

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Apr 4, 2010

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