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Booms, Busts, and Fertility: Testing the Becker Model Using Gender-Specific Labor Demand

Booms, Busts, and Fertility: Testing the Becker Model Using Gender-Specific Labor Demand ABSTRACT: In this paper, I present estimates of the effect of local labor demand shocks on birth rates. To identify exogenous variation in male and female labor demand, I create indices that exploit cross-sectional variation in industry composition, changes in gender-education composition within industries, and growth in national industry employment. Consistent with economic theory, I find that improvements in men’s labor market conditions are associated with increases in fertility while improvements in women’s labor market conditions have smaller negative effects. I separately find that increases in unemployment rates are associated with small decreases in birth rates at the state level. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Resources University of Wisconsin Press

Booms, Busts, and Fertility: Testing the Becker Model Using Gender-Specific Labor Demand

Journal of Human Resources , Volume 51 (1) – Feb 9, 2016

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
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©by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1548-8004
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Abstract

ABSTRACT: In this paper, I present estimates of the effect of local labor demand shocks on birth rates. To identify exogenous variation in male and female labor demand, I create indices that exploit cross-sectional variation in industry composition, changes in gender-education composition within industries, and growth in national industry employment. Consistent with economic theory, I find that improvements in men’s labor market conditions are associated with increases in fertility while improvements in women’s labor market conditions have smaller negative effects. I separately find that increases in unemployment rates are associated with small decreases in birth rates at the state level.

Journal

Journal of Human ResourcesUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Feb 9, 2016

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