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Writing in the Margin: Spanish Literature of the Golden Age (review)

Writing in the Margin: Spanish Literature of the Golden Age (review) Writing in the Margin: Spanish Literature of the Golden Age (review) Edward H. Friedman The Comparatist, Volume 16, May 1992, pp. 144-146 (Review) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.1992.0004 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/415074/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 11:12 GMT from JHU Libraries REVIEWS heard—is very strong" (131). The debate about the time of day between Petruchio and Kate is crucial. "Man is figured by the sun which is always the same as itself, whereas woman is figured by a waxing waning moon which is always other than itself." Thus, "woman is the other to man, the hetew- to -Homo precisely because her essence is to be this lunatic difference between sameness and difference" (136). While the plot of the play reinforces the spatial, hierarchal, visionary "order of things," the oral residue of Kate's—and Petruchio's—jokes, ramblings, and tantrums, remains to blur distinctions and confuse conclusions. In his reading of Othello, Fineman considers the "formal zero authorial person immanent in Shakespeare's plays," as an extension of the subjectivity effect he traces back to the sonnets (144). This is Keats' notion of Shake- speare's "negative capability" brought up to date—that uncanny avoidance of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Writing in the Margin: Spanish Literature of the Golden Age (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 16 – Oct 3, 2012

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

Writing in the Margin: Spanish Literature of the Golden Age (review) Edward H. Friedman The Comparatist, Volume 16, May 1992, pp. 144-146 (Review) Published by The University of North Carolina Press DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/com.1992.0004 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/415074/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 11:12 GMT from JHU Libraries REVIEWS heard—is very strong" (131). The debate about the time of day between Petruchio and Kate is crucial. "Man is figured by the sun which is always the same as itself, whereas woman is figured by a waxing waning moon which is always other than itself." Thus, "woman is the other to man, the hetew- to -Homo precisely because her essence is to be this lunatic difference between sameness and difference" (136). While the plot of the play reinforces the spatial, hierarchal, visionary "order of things," the oral residue of Kate's—and Petruchio's—jokes, ramblings, and tantrums, remains to blur distinctions and confuse conclusions. In his reading of Othello, Fineman considers the "formal zero authorial person immanent in Shakespeare's plays," as an extension of the subjectivity effect he traces back to the sonnets (144). This is Keats' notion of Shake- speare's "negative capability" brought up to date—that uncanny avoidance of

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Oct 3, 2012

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