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Where Are We Going and Who Will We Teach?: Conjectures about Comparative Literature and the Humanities

Where Are We Going and Who Will We Teach?: Conjectures about Comparative Literature and the... r oss s hi Deler Where Are We Going and Who Will We Teach? Conjectures about Comparative Literature and the Humanities1 i Th s paper oe ff rs a dark and light macro and micro vision of graduate education in the Humanities in the United States with some anecdotal evidence specic fi to Comparative Literature. I’ll intersperse my comments with some data and con- clude with a few comments about the future of Comparative Literature. As Haun Saussy has so eloquently argued, “Comparative Literature has won its battles. It has never been better received in the American university” (3). But where is the Ameri- can university going? As an amateur in the e fi ld of higher education studies, let me propose a few answers. First, Comparative Literature in the U.S. seems to be thriving. e Th membership of the a Cl a has doubled from approximately 600 to 1200 in the past two years. Th ere are about 175 Comparative Literature programs and departments in the U.S. according to the September 2006 pml a . Not all of these, however, are in the Carne- gie Foundation’s 96 Very High Research Universities, nor in the 3 10 High Research http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

Where Are We Going and Who Will We Teach?: Conjectures about Comparative Literature and the Humanities

The Comparatist , Volume 32 – May 24, 2008

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Southern Comparative Literature Association.
ISSN
1559-0887

Abstract

r oss s hi Deler Where Are We Going and Who Will We Teach? Conjectures about Comparative Literature and the Humanities1 i Th s paper oe ff rs a dark and light macro and micro vision of graduate education in the Humanities in the United States with some anecdotal evidence specic fi to Comparative Literature. I’ll intersperse my comments with some data and con- clude with a few comments about the future of Comparative Literature. As Haun Saussy has so eloquently argued, “Comparative Literature has won its battles. It has never been better received in the American university” (3). But where is the Ameri- can university going? As an amateur in the e fi ld of higher education studies, let me propose a few answers. First, Comparative Literature in the U.S. seems to be thriving. e Th membership of the a Cl a has doubled from approximately 600 to 1200 in the past two years. Th ere are about 175 Comparative Literature programs and departments in the U.S. according to the September 2006 pml a . Not all of these, however, are in the Carne- gie Foundation’s 96 Very High Research Universities, nor in the 3 10 High Research

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 24, 2008

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