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When Did Indians Become Straight?: Kinship, the History of Sexuality, and Native Sovereignty (review)

When Did Indians Become Straight?: Kinship, the History of Sexuality, and Native Sovereignty... resistance to not only the symbolic but also the communitarian ideal implicit in both literary humanism and anti-humanism. Wallace, by playing off of Mary Midgley's Science and Poetry before moving on to Michel Houellebecq's Atomised, challenges the "depth" of the humanistic self and warns against a simple opposition between the ostensible "richness" of the literary in contrast to the scientific tradition. Earnshaw tracks the tension between abstract values and realism, suggesting-- against an overly optimistic humanistic spirit--a sense of "joyful cruelty" working through Eliot's Middlemarch. Callus and Herbrechter close the section with one of the volume's highlights; by reading Musil's The Man Without Qualities alongside Agamben's Man Without Content they consider the posthuman in the high "literary" canon as well as in technoculture. The final section--"Literature, Democracy, Humanisms from Below"--presents a more fully politicized sense of critical humanism, beginning with Arsenijevi's chapter on the contemporary poetry of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Using Benjamin as his theoretical guide, Arsenijevi offers the useful notion of "unbribable life": the voice, located in the poetic response to genocide, that insists upon equality in its resistance of political narratives. Robson's focus is also on poetry; culminating in an analysis of Jo Shapcott's lyric, his http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Comparatist University of North Carolina Press

When Did Indians Become Straight?: Kinship, the History of Sexuality, and Native Sovereignty (review)

The Comparatist , Volume 36 (1) – May 19, 2012

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University of North Carolina Press
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Copyright © Southern Comparative Literature Association.
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1559-0887
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Abstract

resistance to not only the symbolic but also the communitarian ideal implicit in both literary humanism and anti-humanism. Wallace, by playing off of Mary Midgley's Science and Poetry before moving on to Michel Houellebecq's Atomised, challenges the "depth" of the humanistic self and warns against a simple opposition between the ostensible "richness" of the literary in contrast to the scientific tradition. Earnshaw tracks the tension between abstract values and realism, suggesting-- against an overly optimistic humanistic spirit--a sense of "joyful cruelty" working through Eliot's Middlemarch. Callus and Herbrechter close the section with one of the volume's highlights; by reading Musil's The Man Without Qualities alongside Agamben's Man Without Content they consider the posthuman in the high "literary" canon as well as in technoculture. The final section--"Literature, Democracy, Humanisms from Below"--presents a more fully politicized sense of critical humanism, beginning with Arsenijevi's chapter on the contemporary poetry of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Using Benjamin as his theoretical guide, Arsenijevi offers the useful notion of "unbribable life": the voice, located in the poetic response to genocide, that insists upon equality in its resistance of political narratives. Robson's focus is also on poetry; culminating in an analysis of Jo Shapcott's lyric, his

Journal

The ComparatistUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: May 19, 2012

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