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Upon the Altar of Work: Child Labor and the Rise of a New American Sectionalism by Betsy Wood (review)

Upon the Altar of Work: Child Labor and the Rise of a New American Sectionalism by Betsy Wood... Minor quibbles aside, Hilde’s book is both timely and compelling. Slav- ery, Fatherhood, and Paternal Duty should be essential reading for histo- rians of slavery, the American family, and masculinity. John Patrick Riley john patrick riley is an adjunct history lecturer at Binghamton University, SUNY, and the author of “‘I Love Country but I Love Family and Self More’: The Emotional World of Civil War Family Men,” forthcoming in Civil War History. Upon the Altar of Work: Child Labor and the Rise of a New American Sectionalism. By Betsy Wood. (Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2020. Pp. 266. Cloth, $110.00; paper, $28.00.) The U.S. Civil War engendered the abolition of chattel slavery but left unaddressed the status of the youngest members of the republic. In this slim, engaging book, Betsy Wood explores how debates over child labor changed between the 1850s and the 1930s. In so doing, she suggests that the continued fight over the presence of children in the workplace underscores not only the legacies of abolitionism and antislavery activism, but also continued sectional tensions between the North and the South. Previous scholarship on the decline of child labor attributes the decreasing numbers of children forced to toil http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of the Civil War Era University of North Carolina Press

Upon the Altar of Work: Child Labor and the Rise of a New American Sectionalism by Betsy Wood (review)

The Journal of the Civil War Era , Volume 11 (4) – Nov 12, 2021

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Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Copyright
Copyright @ The University of North Carolina Press
ISSN
2159-9807

Abstract

Minor quibbles aside, Hilde’s book is both timely and compelling. Slav- ery, Fatherhood, and Paternal Duty should be essential reading for histo- rians of slavery, the American family, and masculinity. John Patrick Riley john patrick riley is an adjunct history lecturer at Binghamton University, SUNY, and the author of “‘I Love Country but I Love Family and Self More’: The Emotional World of Civil War Family Men,” forthcoming in Civil War History. Upon the Altar of Work: Child Labor and the Rise of a New American Sectionalism. By Betsy Wood. (Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2020. Pp. 266. Cloth, $110.00; paper, $28.00.) The U.S. Civil War engendered the abolition of chattel slavery but left unaddressed the status of the youngest members of the republic. In this slim, engaging book, Betsy Wood explores how debates over child labor changed between the 1850s and the 1930s. In so doing, she suggests that the continued fight over the presence of children in the workplace underscores not only the legacies of abolitionism and antislavery activism, but also continued sectional tensions between the North and the South. Previous scholarship on the decline of child labor attributes the decreasing numbers of children forced to toil

Journal

The Journal of the Civil War EraUniversity of North Carolina Press

Published: Nov 12, 2021

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